Science and Engineering Ethics 21 (4):895-906 (2015)

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Abstract
It is often argued that the fact that intellectual objects—objects like ideas, inventions, concepts, and melodies—can be used by several people simultaneously makes intellectual property rights impossible or particularly difficult to morally justify. In this article, I assess the line of criticism of intellectual ownership in connection with a central category of intellectual property rights, economic rights to intellectual property. I maintain that it is unconvincing
Keywords Economic rights to intellectual property  Intellectual ownership  Non-rivalrousness of intellectual objects  Rivalrousness of material objects  Theories of property
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DOI 10.1007/s11948-014-9574-4
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References found in this work BETA

Two Treatises of Government.John Locke - 1988 - Cambridge University Press.
There is No Such Thing as an Unjust Initial Acquisition.Edward Feser - 2005 - Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (1):56-80.
Intellectual Property.Adam Moore - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Labor as the Basis for Intellectual Property Rights.Bryan Cwik - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (4):681-695.

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