Kant and Women

Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (4):653-694 (2017)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

Kant's conception of women is complex. Although he struggles to bring his considered view of women into focus, a sympathetic reading shows it not to be anti-feminist and to contain important arguments regarding human nature. Kant believes the traditional male-female distinction is unlikely to disappear, but he never proposes the traditional gender ideal as the moral ideal; he rejects the idea that such considerations of philosophical anthropology can set the framework for morality. This is also why his moral works clarifies that all citizens, including women have the right, and should be encouraged to strive towards an active condition.

Analytics

Added to PP
2015-10-25

Downloads
18,813 (#129)

6 months
2,196 (#281)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Helga Varden
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Citations of this work

Freedom and poverty in the Kantian state.Rafeeq Hasan - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (3):911-931.
Kant’s Racism.Lucy Allais - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):1-36.
A Kantian approach to education for moral sensitivity.Paul Formosa - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 55 (6):1017-1028.
At the Bar of Conscience: A Kantian Argument for Slavery Reparations.Jason R. Fisette - 2022 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 48 (5):674-702.

View all 11 citations / Add more citations

References found in this work

Practical philosophy.Immanuel Kant - 1996 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Mary J. Gregor.
Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals.Immanuel Kant - 1996 - In Mary J. Gregor (ed.), Practical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. pp. 37-108.
The man of reason: "male" and "female" in Western philosophy.Genevieve Lloyd - 1993 - Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.
Religion and Rational Theology: The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Immanuael Kant.Immanuel Kant, Allen W. Wood & George Di Giovanni (eds.) - 1996 - Cambridge, UK: Cambridge UP. Translated by George Di Giovanni, Mary J. Gregor & Allen W. Wood.

View all 38 references / Add more references