Language, cognition, and the nature of modularity: Evidence from aphasia

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):702-703 (2002)
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Abstract

We examine Carruthers’ proposal that sentences in logical form serve to create flexibility within central system modularity, enabling the combination of information from different modalities. We discuss evidence from aphasia and the neurobiology of input-output systems. This work suggests that there exists considerable capacity for interdomain cognitive processing without language mediation. Other challenges for a logical form account are noted.

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