Consciousness and Cognition 6 (2-3):237-66 (1997)

Abstract
Neuropsychological deficits have been widely used to elucidate normal cognitive functioning. Can patients with such deficits also be used to understand conscious visual experience? In this paper, we ask what it would be like to be a patient with apperceptive agnosia . Philosophical analyses of such questions have suggested that subjectively experiencing what another person experiences would be impossible. Although such roadblocks into the conscious experience of others exist, the experimental study of both patients and neurologically normal subjects can be used to understand visual processing mechanisms. In order to understand the visual processes damaged in apperceptive agnosia, we first review this syndrome and present a case study of one such patient, patient J.W. We then review several theoretical accounts of apperceptive agnosia, and we conclude that studies of the patients themselves may not allow us to discriminate between the various explanations of the syndrome. To test these accounts, we have simulated apperceptive agnosia in neurologically normal subjects. The implications of our results for understanding both apperceptive agnosia and normal visual processing are discussed
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DOI 10.1006/ccog.1997.0304
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A Feature Integration Theory of Attention.Anne Treisman - 1980 - Cognitive Psychology 12:97-136.
Components of Visual Orienting.M. I. Posner & Y. Cohen - 1984 - Attention and Performance X 32:531-556.

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