Competence and Ability

Bioethics 28 (5):235-244 (2012)
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Abstract

It is nearly universally thought that the kind of decision-making competence that gives one a strong prima facie right to make one's own medical decisions essentially involves having an ability (or abilities) of some sort, or having a certain level or degree of ability (or abilities). When put under philosophical scrutiny, however, this kind of theory does not hold up. I will argue that being competent does not essentially involve abilities, and I will propose and defend a theory of decision-making competence according to which one is competent only if one possesses a certain kind of rationality in making treatment decisions

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Eric Vogelstein
Duquesne University

Citations of this work

Evaluating Medico-Legal Decisional Competency Criteria.Demian Whiting - 2015 - Health Care Analysis 23 (2):181-196.

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