Cambridge, MA, USA: MIT Press (2015)

Authors
Steven Vogel
Denison University
Abstract
A provocative argument that environmental thinking would be better off if it dropped the concept of “nature” altogether and spoke instead of the built environment. Environmentalism, in theory and practice, is concerned with protecting nature. But if we have now reached “the end of nature,” as Bill McKibben and other environmental thinkers have declared, what is there left to protect? In Thinking like a Mall, Steven Vogel argues that environmental thinking would be better off if it dropped the concept of “nature” altogether and spoke instead of the “environment”—that is, the world that actually surrounds us, which is always a built world, the only one that we inhabit. We need to think not so much like a mountain (as Aldo Leopold urged) as like a mall. Shopping malls, too, are part of the environment and deserve as much serious consideration from environmental thinkers as do mountains. Vogel argues provocatively that environmental philosophy, in its ethics, should no longer draw a distinction between the natural and the artificial and, in its politics, should abandon the idea that something beyond human practices (such as “nature”) can serve as a standard determining what those practices ought to be. The appeal to nature distinct from the built environment, he contends, may be not merely unhelpful to environmental thinking but in itself harmful to that thinking. The question for environmental philosophy is not “how can we save nature?” but rather “what environment should we inhabit, and what practices should we engage in to help build it?”
Keywords Environmental Philosophy, Nature, Artifacts, Philosophy of technology, Social and Political Philosophy
Categories (categorize this paper)
Reprint years 2016
Buy this book $11.65 used (52% off)   $23.05 new (5% off)   $24.23 from Amazon    Amazon page
ISBN(s) 0262529718   9780262529716   0262029103
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 68,975
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Environmental Ethics.Andrew Brennan - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Artifact.Risto Hilpinen - 1999 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Artifact.Beth Preston - 2018 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Are Humans Disturbing Conditions in Ecology?S. Andrew Inkpen - 2017 - Biology and Philosophy 32 (1):51-71.

View all 29 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Environmental Philosophy After the End of Nature.Steven Vogel - 2002 - Environmental Ethics 24 (1):23-39.
Environmental Philosophy After the End of Nature.Steven Vogel - 2002 - Environmental Ethics 24 (1):23-39.
Doing Without Nature in Advance.Steven Vogel - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy.
Thinking Like a Mall: Environmental Philosophy After the End of Nature.Emily Ray - 2017 - Contemporary Political Theory 16 (4):549-552.
Environmental Ethics and the Built Environment.Roger J. H. King - 2000 - Environmental Ethics 22 (2):115-131.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2018-09-18

Total views
4 ( #1,273,217 of 2,498,155 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
4 ( #171,347 of 2,498,155 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes