Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (1):57-61 (2014)

Abstract
It has been argued that organs should be treated as individual tradable property like other material possessions and assets, on the basis that this would promote individual freedom and increase efficiency in addressing the shortage of organs for transplantation. If organs are to be treated as property, should they be inheritable? This paper seeks to contribute to the idea of organs as inheritable property by providing a defence of a default of the family of a dead person as inheritors of transplantable organs. In the course of discussion, various succession rules for organs and their justifications will be suggested. We then consider two objections to organs as inheritable property. Our intention here is to provoke further thought on whether ownership of one's body parts should be assimilated to property ownership
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DOI 10.1136/medethics-2013-101336
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My Body, My Property.Lori B. Andrews - 1986 - Hastings Center Report 16 (5):28-38.
Bodily Rights and Property Rights.B. Bjorkman - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):209-214.

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