Franciscan Studies 78 (1):159-170 (2020)

Authors
Thomas M. Ward
Baylor University
Abstract
I do not think scholars have thought hard enough about Scotus’s position that there are necessary moral truths over which God has no control. Just about everyone who writes on Scotus’s ethics has noted this position, but none has paid sufficient philosophical attention to it. It turns out that necessary moral truths are logically necessary (in Scotus’s sense of logical modalities), and the fact that they are logically necessary significantly alters how we should understand radical-sounding claims in Scotus to the effect that God can do whatever is logically possible. Demonstrably, what Scotus means is that God can do whatever it is logically possible for God to do, and this class is rather smaller than the class of the logically possible simpliciter.
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DOI 10.1353/frc.2020.0011
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References found in this work BETA

The Unmitigated Scotus.Thomas Williams - 1998 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 80 (2):162-181.
The Unshredded Scotus: A Response to Thomas Williams.Allan B. Wolter - 2003 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 77 (3):315-356.
Letting Scotus Speak for Himself.Mary Beth Ingham - 2001 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 10 (2):173-216.
Duns Scotus, Morality and Happiness.C. S. J. Ingham - 2000 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 74 (2):173-195.

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