Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):151-152 (2008)

Abstract
The history of comparative psychology is replete with proclamations of human uniqueness. Locke and Morgan denied animals relational thought; Darwin opened the door to that possibility. Penn et al. may be too quick to dismiss the cognitive competences of animals. The developmental precursors to relational thought in humans are not yet known; providing animals those prerequisite experiences may promote more advanced relational thought
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DOI 10.1017/S0140525X08003774
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An Essay Concerning Human Understanding.John Locke - 1689 - London, England: Oxford University Press.
An Introduction to Comparative Psychology.C. Lloyd Morgan - 1903 - London: Walter Scott Publishing.

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