Should we respond to evil with indifference?

Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (3):613–635 (2005)
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Abstract

In a recent article, Adam Elga outlines a strategy for “Defeating Dr Evil with Self-Locating Belief”. The strategy relies on an indifference principle that is not up to the task. In general, there are two things to dislike about indifference principles: adopting one normally means confusing risk for uncertainty, and they tend to lead to incoherent views in some ‘paradoxical’ situations. I argue that both kinds of objection can be levelled against Elga’s indifference principle. There are also some difficulties with the concept of evidence that Elga uses, and these create further difficulties for the principle.

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Brian Weatherson
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Citations of this work

Imagining as a Guide to Possibility.Peter Kung - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 81 (3):620-663.
Confirmation in a Branching World: The Everett Interpretation and Sleeping Beauty.Darren Bradley - 2011 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (2):323-342.

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References found in this work

Reference and Consciousness.J. Campbell - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
A Treatise on Probability.John Maynard Keynes - 1921 - London, England: Dover Publications.
Attitudes de dicto and de se.David Lewis - 1979 - Philosophical Review 88 (4):513-543.
Risk, Uncertainty and Profit.Frank Knight - 1921 - University of Chicago Press.

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