Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (2):258-275 (2017)

Authors
Steven Weimer
Arkansas State University
Abstract
In two recent articles, Nicholas Dixon has argued that the intent to hurt and injure opponents which is essential to mixed martial arts makes the sport intrinsically immoral. Although bondage, domination, sadism, and masochism also involves the intentional infliction of pain and injury, Dixon argues that it is morally permissible in many cases. In this paper, I examine the principle underlying Dixon's differentiation of MMA and BDSM. I argue that, when properly elaborated, that principle does not in fact condemn MMA as intrinsically immoral, but rather implies that the attitudes and actions of most autonomously consenting amateur MMA fighters and some autonomously consenting professionals are prima facie morally permissible.
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DOI 10.1080/00948705.2017.1320944
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References found in this work BETA

The Value of Dangerous Sport.J. S. Russell - 2005 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 32 (1):1-19.
Boxing, Paternalism, and Legal Moralism.Nicholas Dixon - 2001 - Social Theory and Practice 27 (2):323-344.
Internalism and External Moral Evaluation of Violent Sport.Nicholas Dixon - 2016 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 43 (1):101-113.
Boxing, Paternalism, and Legal Moralism.Nicholas Dixon - 2001 - Social Theory and Practice 27 (2):323-344.
Ethical Issues in Boxing.Paul Davis - 1993 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 20 (1):48-63.

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Citations of this work BETA

Ethics of Mixed Martial Arts.Walter Veit & Heather Browning - forthcoming - In J. Holt & M. Ramsay (eds.), The Philosophy of Mixed Martial Arts: Squaring the Octagon. London: Routledge. pp. 134-149.
Rights and Consent in Mixed Martial Arts.Stephen Kershnar & Robert Kelly - 2019 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 47 (1):105-120.
The Moral Responsibilities of Fandom.George Tyler - 2021 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 48 (1):111-128.

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