Faith and Philosophy 28 (1):82-92 (2011)

Abstract
Religious faith is often critiqued as irrational either because its beliefs do not rise to the level of knowledge as defined by some philosophical theory or be­cause it rests on emotion rather than knowledge. Or both. Kierkegaard helps us to see how these arguments rest on a misunderstanding of all three terms: faith, reason, and emotion
Keywords Contemporary Philosophy  Philosophy and Religion
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ISBN(s) 0739-7046
DOI 10.5840/faithphil201128118
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Faith as a Passion and Virtue.Ryan West - 2013 - Res Philosophica 90 (4):565-587.

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