Philosophy and Technology 24 (1):35-53 (2011)

Authors
Graham White
Queen Mary University of London
Abstract
We compare the role of Cartesian assumptions in the symbol grounding problem and in the Myth of the Given: We argue that the Sellars–McDowell critique of the Myth of the Given and, in particular, its use of the concept of normativity can provide useful resources for responding to the symbol grounding problem. We also describe the concepts of normativity at work in computer science and cognitive science: We argue that normative concepts are pervasive in the sciences and that, in particular, McDowell’s dichotomy between the normative space of reasons and the realm of nature is somewhat problematic
Keywords Myth of the Given  Cognitive Science  Symbol Grounding Problem  normativity
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DOI 10.1007/s13347-010-0005-4
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References found in this work BETA

Mind and World.John McDowell - 1994 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
Computing Machinery and Intelligence.Alan M. Turing - 1950 - Mind 59 (October):433-60.
Mind and World.John Mcdowell - 1996 - Philosophical Quarterly 46 (182):99-109.
The Symbol Grounding Problem.Stevan Harnad - 1990 - Physica D 42:335-346.

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