Empirically Investigating the Concept of Lying

Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research 34 (3):591-609 (2017)
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Abstract

Lying is an everyday moral phenomenon about which philosophers have written a lot. Not only the moral status of lying has been intensively discussed but also what it means to lie in the first place. Perhaps the most important criterion for an adequate definition of lying is that it fits with people’s understanding and use of this concept. In this light, it comes as a surprise that researchers only recently started to empirically investigate the folk concept of lying. In this paper, we describe three experimental studies which address the following questions: Does a statement need to be objectively false in order to constitute lying? Does lying necessarily include the intention to deceive? Can one lie by omitting relevant facts?

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Author Profiles

Alex Wiegmann
Ruhr-Universität Bochum
Pascale Willemsen
University of Zürich

References found in this work

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Logic and Conversation.H. P. Grice - 1975 - In Donald Davidson & Gilbert Harman (eds.), The Logic of Grammar. Encino, CA: pp. 64-75.
What Is Lying.Don Fallis - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy 106 (1):29-56.
The truth about lying.Angelo Turri & John Turri - 2015 - Cognition 138 (C):161-168.
The definition of lying.Thomas L. Carson - 2006 - Noûs 40 (2):284–306.

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