Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):523-532 (2008)

Authors
Nathaniel Wilcox
Chapman University
Abstract
Neuroeconomics illustrates our deepening descent into the details of individual cognition. This descent is guided by the implicit assumption that “individual human” is the important “agent” of neoclassical economics. I argue here that this assumption is neither obviously correct, nor of primary importance to human economies. In particular I suggest that the main genius of the human species lies with its ability to distribute cognition across individuals, and to incrementally accumulate physical and social cognitive artifacts that largely obviate the innate biological limitations of individuals. If this is largely why our economies grow, then we should be much more interested in distributed cognition in human groups, and correspondingly less interested in individual cognition. We should also be much more interested in the cultural accumulation of cognitive artefacts: computational devices and media, social structures and economic institutions.
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1017/S0266267108002137
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

References found in this work BETA

The Language of Thought.Jerry A. Fodor - 1975 - Harvard University Press.
Vison.David Marr - 1982 - W. H. Freeman.

View all 16 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

The Methodologies of Neuroeconomics.Glenn Harrison & Don Ross - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):185-196.
Neuroeconomics: A Rejoinder.Glenn W. Harrison - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):533-544.

View all 8 citations / Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Outsourced Cognition.Mikkel Gerken - 2014 - Philosophical Issues 24 (1):127-158.
Distributed Cognition Without Distributed Knowing.Ronald N. Giere - 2007 - Social Epistemology 21 (3):313-320.
Extended Mind and Cognitive Enhancement: Moral Aspects of Cognitive Artifacts.Richard Heersmink - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (1):17-32.
Sociality and the Life–Mind Continuity Thesis.Tom Froese & Ezequiel A. Di Paolo - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):439-463.
The Cognitive Side of Social Responsibility.Davide Secchi - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S3):565-581.
The Motor Theory of Social Cognition: A Critique.Pierre Jacob & Marc Jeannerod - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):21-25.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2009-01-28

Total views
353 ( #25,840 of 2,454,576 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
26 ( #28,524 of 2,454,576 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes