The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley

New York: Cambridge University Press (2005)
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Abstract

George Berkeley is one of the greatest and most influential modern philosophers. In defending the immaterialism for which he is most famous, he redirected modern thinking about the nature of objectivity and the mind's capacity to come to terms with it. Along the way, he made striking and influential proposals concerning the psychology of the senses, the workings of language, the aims of science, and the scope of mathematics. In this Companion volume a team of distinguished authors not only examines Berkeley's achievements but also his neglected contributions to moral and political philosophy, his writings on economics and development, and his defense of religious commitment and religious life. The volume places Berkeley's achievements in the context of the many social and intellectual traditions - philosophical, scientific, ethical, and religious - to which he fashioned a distinctive response.

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Berkeley's argument for immaterialism.A. C. Grayling - 2005 - In Kenneth P. Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. pp. 166--189.
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Author's Profile

Kenneth Winkler
Yale University

Citations of this work

George Berkeley.Lisa Downing - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Reid on the priority of natural language.John Turri - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (S1):214-223.
Idealism and Common Sense.C. A. McIntosh - 2021 - In Joshua Farris & Benedikt Paul Göcke (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Idealism and Immaterialism. pp. 496-505.
The Role of Visual Language in Berkeley’s Account of Generality.Katherine Dunlop - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 83 (3):525-559.

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