Adam Smith’s economic and ethical consideration of animals

History of the Human Sciences 26 (3):52-67 (2013)

Abstract

This article examines Adam Smith’s views on animals, centering on the singularity of his economic perspective in the context of the general early ethical debate about animals. Particular emphasis is placed on his discussions of animals as property. The article highlights the tension between Smith’s moral sensitivity to animal suffering on the one hand, and his emphasis on the constitutive role that the utilization of animals played in the progress of civilization on the other. This tension is depicted as a precursor of problematic aspects of the modern environmental crisis

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References found in this work

The Theory of Moral Sentiments.Adam Smith - 1759 - Dover Publications.
The Death of Nature.Carolyn Merchant - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology.
The Historical Roots of Our Ecological Crisis.Lynn White Jr - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application, Belmont: Wadsworth Company.

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Citations of this work

Smith and Hume on Animal Minds.Richard J. Fry - 2018 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 16 (3):227-243.
The Limits of Sympathetic Concern and Moral Consideration in Adam Smith.Ryan Pollock - 2019 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 36 (3):257-277.

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