Economics and Philosophy 22 (3):409-427 (2006)

Authors
Jonathan Wolff
Oxford University
Abstract
The question of when people may impose risks on each other is of fundamental moral importance. Forms of “quantified risk assessment,” especially risk cost-benefit analysis, provide one powerful approach to providing a systematic answer. It is also well known that such techniques can show that existing resources could be used more effectively to reduce risk overall. Thus it is often argued that some current practices are irrational. On the other hand critics of quantified risk assessment argue that it cannot adequately capture all relevant features, such as “societal concern” and so should be abandoned. In this paper I argue that current forms of quantified risk assessment are inadequate, and in themselves, therefore, insufficient to demonstrate that current practices are irrational. In particular, I will argue that insufficient attention has been given to the cause of a hazard, which needs to be treated as a primary variable in its own right. However rather than reject quantified risk assessment I wish to supplement it by proposing a framework to make explicit the role causation plays in the understanding of risk, and how it interacts with factors which influence perception of risks and other attitudes to risk control. Once an improved description of risk perception is available it will become possible to have a more informed debate about the normative question: how safety should be regulated
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DOI 10.1017/S0266267106001040
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References found in this work BETA

Justice and the Distribution of Fear.Keith Burgess-Jackson - 1994 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 32 (4):367-391.
Risk.John Adams - 1996 - Environmental Values 5 (2):181-182.

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Citations of this work BETA

Risk and Responsibility: A Complex and Evolving Relationship.Céline Kermisch - 2012 - Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (1):91-102.
Making the World Safe for Utilitarianism.Jonathan Wolff - 2006 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 58:1-22.

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