The neural representation of spatial predicate-argument structures in sign language

Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (3):300-301 (2003)

Abstract
Evidence from studies of the processing of topographic and classifier constructions in sign language sentences provides a model of how a mental scene description can be represented linguistically, but it also raises questions about how this can be related to spatial linguistic descriptions in spoken languages and their processing. This in turn provides insights into models of the evolution of language.
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DOI 10.1017/S0140525X03410078
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