Kant on Duties Regarding Nonrational Nature

Abstract

Kant's moral philosophy is grounded on the dignity of humanity as its sole fundamental value, and involves the claim that human beings are to be regarded as the ultimate end of nature. It might be thought that a theory of this kind would be incapable of grounding any conception of our relation to other living things or to the natural world which would value nonhuman creatures or respect humanity's natural environment. This paper criticizes Kant's argumentative strategy for dealing with our duties in regard to animals, but defends both his theory and most of his conclusions on these topics.

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Allen Wood
Indiana University, Bloomington

References found in this work

Feminism and Ecology: Making Connections.Karen J. Warren - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (1):3-20.
Feminism and Ecology: Making Connections.Karen J. Warren - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (1):3-20.

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Citations of this work

A Case for Ethical Veganism.Tristram McPherson - 2014 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 11 (6):677-703.
The Ethical Basis for Veganism.Tristram McPherson - 2018 - In Anne Barnhill, Mark Budolfson & Tyler Doggett (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Food Ethics. New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
Veganism, Animal Welfare, and Causal Impotence.Samuel Kahn - 2020 - Journal of Animal Ethics 10 (2):161.

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