Generation of Tunable Microwave Frequency Comb Utilizing a Semiconductor Laser Subject to Optical Injection from an SFP Module Modulated by an Arbitrary Periodic Signal

Complexity 2020:1-7 (2020)

Abstract

In this paper, a microwave frequency comb is generated from a semiconductor laser subject to optical injection from a commercial small form-factor pluggable optical module which is modulated by an arbitrary periodic signal. A sinusoidal signal or square wave signal is employed as the arbitrary periodic signal instead of the electric pulse signal adopted in the former references. When the frequency of the modulated signal is 1 GHz, the MFC with a maximal bandwidth of 15 GHz can be obtained. In addition, taking a sinusoidal signal as an example, the influence of the injection optical power to the slave laser and the modulation frequency of the optical module on the generation of the MFC is analyzed in detail. Finally, the results of MFC generated with a square wave signal injection are presented. The experimental results of this paper provide an important reference for the practical applications of MFC.

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