Kant's view on the parent-child relationship and its problems—Analyses from a temporal perspective as to the creation and rearing of a being endowed with freedom

Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):145-160 (2011)
Abstract
This article will probe into Kant’s viewpoints about parent-child relationship so as to demonstrate that they are inspiring on the one hand—for example on dealing with the relationship as that pertinent to the thing in itself, but on the other hand, there are many flaws. His strategy on avoiding the difficulty of creating by man a being endowed with freedom depends merely on an one-sided comprehension of time, because according to Kant himself, there is a difference as to the time between sensual forms of intuition and expressive form of transcendental imagination. In the Critique of Pure Reason, Kant gives a profound enunciation with respect to the two and the latter is related to free causality and categorical imperative in his moral philosophy. Once it refers to the rights of a being endowed with freedom and the time it requires to maintain them, it is problematic to assert that the creation of such beings is not concerned with, in any sense whatsoever, time and the sensual, mortal body. What is more, Kant failed to take into full consideration that parents are also beings endowed with freedom whose rights to the child are not totally dependent on the latter’s inherent rights but on their own inherent basis. Granting parents too few natural rights, Kant on the other hand allocates them too much obligations in that the parent-child relation is unbalanced in his field of view. Thirdly, he gives no consideration as to whether or not the empirical process of rearing children itself can also create some rights, which nevertheless, should be taken into account when temporal elements can be found from the very original parent-child relationship.
Keywords a being endowed with freedom  time condition  transcendental creation  productivity of transcendental imagination  freedoms of parents  rights  breeding children
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1007/s11466-011-0130-x
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
Edit this record
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Mark as duplicate
Request removal from index
Revision history
Download options
Our Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 30,781
Through your library
References found in this work BETA
Nicomachean Ethics. Aristotle - 1999 - Courier Dover Publications.
Critique of Pure Reason.Immanuel Kant - 1991 - In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Philosophy and Phenomenological Research. Blackwell. pp. 449-451.
Nicomachean Ethics. Aristotle - 1998 - Oxford University Press.

View all 12 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

No citations found.

Add more citations

Similar books and articles
Four Theories of Filial Duty.Simon Keller - 2006 - Philosophical Quarterly 56 (223):254 - 274.
Whither the “Offices of Nature”?Bernard G. Prusak - 2009 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 83:113-128.
In the World but Not Of the World.William S. Wilkerson - 2009 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (1):113-129.
The Right to Parent One's Biological Baby.Anca Gheaus - 2012 - Journal of Political Philosophy 20 (4):432-455.
Raising a Mensch.Shelley Kapnek Rosenberg - 2003 - Jewish Publication Society.
Child Abuse: Parental Rights and the Interests of the Child.David Archard - 1990 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (2):183-194.
Added to PP index
2011-02-13

Total downloads
26 ( #202,894 of 2,199,707 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
1 ( #300,206 of 2,199,707 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Monthly downloads
My notes
Sign in to use this feature