The Epistemic Benefit of Transient Diversity

Erkenntnis 72 (1):17-35 (2010)
  Copy   BIBTEX

Abstract

There is growing interest in understanding and eliciting division of labor within groups of scientists. This paper illustrates the need for this division of labor through a historical example, and a formal model is presented to better analyze situations of this type. Analysis of this model reveals that a division of labor can be maintained in two different ways: by limiting information or by endowing the scientists with extreme beliefs. If both features are present however, cognitive diversity is maintained indefinitely, and as a result agents fail to converge to the truth. Beyond the mechanisms for creating diversity suggested here, this shows that the real epistemic goal is not diversity but transient diversity.

Links

PhilArchive



    Upload a copy of this work     Papers currently archived: 92,038

External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server

Through your library

Similar books and articles

Norms of epistemic diversity.Miriam Solomon - 2006 - Episteme 3 (1-2):23-36.
State of the field: Transient underdetermination and values in science.Justin Biddle - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (1):124-133.
Diversity in Epistemic Communities: A Response to Clough.Maya J. Goldenberg - 2014 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective Vol. 3, No. 5.
Diversity of agents and their interaction.Fenrong Liu - 2009 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 18 (1):23-53.
A transient quantum effect.S. Gudder - 1974 - Foundations of Physics 4 (3):413-416.
The Epistemic Value of Diversity.Emily Robertson - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (2):299-310.
The Epistemic Innocence of Motivated Delusions.Lisa Bortolotti - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition (33):490-499.

Analytics

Added to PP
2009-10-24

Downloads
473 (#40,657)

6 months
77 (#61,847)

Historical graph of downloads
How can I increase my downloads?

Author's Profile

Kevin Zollman
Carnegie Mellon University

References found in this work

Knowledge in a social world.Alvin I. Goldman - 1991 - New York: Oxford University Press.
Scientific reasoning: the Bayesian approach.Peter Urbach & Colin Howson - 1993 - Chicago: Open Court. Edited by Peter Urbach.
The division of cognitive labor.Philip Kitcher - 1990 - Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):5-22.

View all 24 references / Add more references