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  1. How Agencies Market Egg Donation on the Internet: A Qualitative Study.Jason Keehn, Eve Howell, Mark V. Sauer & Robert Klitzman - 2015 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 43 (3):610-618.
    We systematically examined the content of the websites of 46 agencies that buy and sell human eggs to understand how they market themselves to both donors and recipients. We found that these websites use marketing techniques that obscure the realities of egg donation, presenting egg donation as a mutually beneficial and fulfilling experience. Sites emphasize egg donors' emotional fulfillment and address recipients' anxieties by stressing the ability to find the perfect “fit” or “match”, suiting recipients’“preferences”/“desires”, and even designing/customizing a child. (...)
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  • Risk Disclosure and the Recruitment of Oocyte Donors: Are Advertisers Telling the Full Story?Hillary B. Alberta, Roberta M. Berry & Aaron D. Levine - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (2):232-243.
    In vitro fertilization using donated oocytes has proven to be an effective treatment option for many prospective parents struggling with infertility, and the usage of donated oocytes in assisted reproduction has increased markedly since the technique was first successfully used in 1984. Data published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the use of assisted reproductive technologies in the United States indicate that approximately 12% of all ART cycles in the country now use donated oocytes. The increased use (...)
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  • Risk Disclosure and the Recruitment of Oocyte Donors: Are Advertisers Telling the Full Story?Hillary B. Alberta, Roberta M. Berry & Aaron D. Levine - 2014 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 42 (2):232-243.
    This study analyzes 435 oocyte donor recruitment advertisements to assess whether entities recruiting donors of oocytes to be used for in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures include a disclosure of risks associated with the donation process in their advertisements. Such disclosure is required by the self-regulatory guidelines of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and by law in California for advertisements placed in the state. We find very low rates of risk disclosure across entity types and regulatory regimes, although risk (...)
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  • The Oversight and Practice of Oocyte Donation in the United States, United Kingdom and Canada.Aaron D. Levine - 2011 - HEC Forum 23 (1):15-30.
    In vitro fertilization using donated oocytes is an important medical technique that provides the only option for some infertile patients to have children. The technique remains ethically contentious, however, and, as a result of this controversy, different oversight approaches have been developed in countries around the world. This paper examines the oversight and practice of oocyte donation in Canada, the United Kingdom and the United States to examine how policy choices have influenced the development and use of this medical technology. (...)
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  • Prospect Theory: An Analysis of Decision Under Risk.D. Kahneman & A. Tversky - 1979 - Econometrica: Journal of the Econometric Society:263--291.
    The following values have no corresponding Zotero field: PB - JSTOR.
     
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  • Reproductive Biocrossings: Indian Egg Donors and Surrogates in the Globalized Fertility Market.Jyotsna Agnihotri Gupta - 2012 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 5 (1):25-51.
    In November–December 2006, a four-part documentary, A Child against All Odds, aired on BBC television, presented by a renowned British infertility specialist, physician Robert Winston. The series portrayed the reproductive journeys of several couples who apparently had very low chances of biologically conceiving their own children. The series had all the ingredients of a medical thriller, with individuals, couples, and reproductive body parts (their own and donors’) crossing national boundaries and traveling thousands of miles in what Marcia Inhorn (2002) calls (...)
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  • Disclosure of Information to Potential Subjects on Research Recruitment Web Sites.R. Klitzman, I. Albala, J. Siragusa, J. Patel & P. S. Appelbaum - 2007 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 30 (1):15-20.
    Despite the developing influence of the Internet as a tool for reaching potential subjects, little empirical information exits on how individuals are recruited to participate in clinical research via the Internet or on what type of information clinical trial Web sites provide. This study revealed that roughly half of the sites failed to mention study risks or specific details about what the study required on the part of participants, while nearly three-quarters described incentives to participate. Moreover, for-profit entities were more (...)
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  • Self-Regulation, Compensation, and the Ethical Recruitment of Oocyte Donors.Aaron D. Levine - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (2):25-36.
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