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Alessia Marabini & Luca Moretti (2017). Assessing Concept Possession as an Explicit and Social Practice.

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  1. Analyticity Reconsidered.Paul Artin Boghossian - 1996 - Noûs 30 (3):360-391.
    This is what many philosophers believe today about the analytic/synthetic distinction: In his classic early writings on analyticity -- in particular, in "Truth by Convention," "Two Dogmas of Empiricism," and "Carnap and Logical Truth" -- Quine showed that there can be no distinction between sentences that are true purely by virtue of their meaning and those that are not. In so doing, Quine devastated the philosophical programs that depend upon a notion of analyticity -- specifically, the linguistic theory of necessary (...)
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    Articulating Reasons.Robert B. Brandom - 2001 - Erkenntnis 55 (1):121-127.
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    Can Inferentialism Contribute to Social Epistemology?Jan Derry - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (2):222-235.
    This article argues that Robert Brandom's work can be used to develop ideas in the area of social epistemology. It suggests that this work, precisely because it was influenced by Hegel, can make a significant contribution with philosophical anthropology at its centre. The argument is developed using illustrations from education: the first, from the now classic replication of Piaget's ‘three mountains task’ by Margaret Donaldson and her colleagues; the second, from contemporary debates about the questions of knowledge and epistemic access. (...)
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    Designation.Michael Devitt - 1984 - Noûs 18 (2):357-367.
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    The Concept of Logical Consequence.John Etchemendy - 2001 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 7 (3):379-380.
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    Provisoes: A Problem Concerning the Inferential Function of Scientific Theories. [REVIEW]Carl G. Hempel - 1988 - Erkenntnis 28 (2):147 - 164.
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    Understanding as Endorsing an Inference.Andrew Jorgensen - 2008 - Polish Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):35-54.
    Fodor & Lepore (2001) and Williamson (2003) attack the inferentialist account of concept possession according to which possessing or understanding a concept requires endorsing the inference patterns constitutive of its content. I show that Fodor & Lepore's concern – that the conception places an exorbitant epistemological demands on possessors of a concept – is met by Brandom's tolerance of materially bad nonconservative inferences. Such inferences themselves, as Williamson argues, present difficulties for the 'understanding as endorsement' conception. I show that, properly (...)
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  8. Natural Laws and the Problem of Provisos.Marc Lange - 1993 - Erkenntnis 38 (2):233Ð248.
    Hempel and Giere contend that the existence of provisos poses grave difficulties for any regularity account of physical law. However, Hempel and Giere rely upon a mistaken conception of the way in which statements acquire their content. By correcting this mistake, I remove the problem Hempel and Giere identify but reveal a different problem that provisos pose for a regularity account — indeed, for any account of physical law according to which the state of affairs described by a law-statement presupposes (...)
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    Making It Explicit.Isaac Levi & Robert B. Brandom - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy 93 (3):145.
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  10. Inferentialism and the Compositionality of Meaning.Jaroslav Peregrin - unknown
    Inferentialism, which I am going to present in detail in the following sections, is the view that meanings are, roughly, roles that are acquired by types of sounds and inscriptions in virtue of their being treated according to rules of our language games, roughly in the sense in which wooden pieces acquire certain roles by being treated according the rules of chess. The most important consequences are that (i) a meaning is not an object labeled (stood for, represented ...) by (...)
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  11. Inferentialism and the Normativity of Meaning.Jaroslav Peregrin - 2012 - Philosophia 40 (1):75-97.
    There may be various reasons for claiming that meaning is normative, and additionally, very different senses attached to the claim. However, all such claims have faced fierce resistance from those philosophers who insist that meaning is not normative in any nontrivial sense of the word. In this paper I sketch one particular approach to meaning claiming its normativity and defend it against the anti-normativist critique: namely the approach of Brandomian inferentialism. However, my defense is not restricted to inferentialism in any (...)
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  12. Inference and Meaning.Wilfrid Sellars - 1953 - Mind 62 (247):313-338.