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  1. Langton and Lewis on “Intrinsic”.Dan Marshall & Josh Parsons - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):347-351.
    In their paper “Defining ‘Intrinsic’” Rae Langton and David Lewis propose a definition of intrinsicality in terms of modality and naturalness. Their key idea, drawing on earlier work by Jaegwon Kim, was that an intrinsic property is one that is independent of accompaniment, which is to say that P is intrinsic iff the following four conditions are all met.
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  • Philosophy and Scientific Realism.J. J. C. Smart - 1963 - Routledge.
    Originally published in 1963. In an introductory chapter the author argues that philosophy ought to be more than the art of clarifying thought and that it should concern itself with outlining a scientifically plausible world view. Early chapters deal with phenomenalism and the reality of theoretical entities, and with the relation between the physical and biological sciences. Free will, issues of time and space and man’s place in nature are covered in later chapters.
  • Dispositional Essentialism.Brian Ellis & Caroline Lierse - 1994 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 72 (1):27 – 45.
  • Intrinsic Properties and Combinatorial Principles.Brian Weatherson - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):365-380.
    Three objections have recently been levelled at the analysis of intrinsicness offered by Rae Langton and David Lewis. While these objections do seem telling against the particular theory Langton and Lewis offer, they do not threaten the broader strategy Langton and Lewis adopt: defining intrinsicness in terms of combinatorial features of properties. I show how to amend their theory to overcome the objections without abandoning the strategy.
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  • Critique of Pure Reason.Immanuel Kant - 1998 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This entirely new translation of Critique of Pure Reason by Paul Guyer and Allan Wood is the most accurate and informative English translation ever produced of this epochal philosophical text. Though its simple, direct style will make it suitable for all new readers of Kant, the translation displays a philosophical and textual sophistication that will enlighten Kant scholars as well. This translation recreates as far as possible a text with the same interpretative nuances and richness as the original.
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  • Redefining 'Intrinsic'.David K. Lewis - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):381-398.
    Several alleged counterexamples to the definition of ‘intrinsic’ proposed in Rae Langton and David Lewis, ‘Defining “Intrinsic”’, are unconvincing. Yet there are reasons for dissatisfaction, and room for improvement. One desirable change is to raise the standard of non-disjunctiveness, thereby putting less burden on contentious judgements of comparative naturalness. A second is to deal with spurious independence by throwing out just the disjunctive troublemakers, instead of throwing out disjunctive properties wholesale, and afterward reinstating those impeccably intrinsic disjunctive properties that are (...)
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  • In Defense of Pure Reason.Laurence BonJour - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    A comprehensive defence of the rationalist view that insight independent of experience is a genuine basis for knowledge.
  • The Semantics of 'Things in Themselves': A Deflationary Account.Frederick Kroon - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (203):165-181.
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  • Things in Themselves.Robert Merrihew Adams - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (4):801-825.
    The paper is an interpretation and defense of Kant's conception of things in themselves as noumena, along the following lines. Noumena are transempirical realities. As such they have several important roles in Kant's critical philosophy (Section 1). Our theoretical faculties cannot obtain enough content for a conception of noumena that would assure their real possibility as objects, but can establish their merely formal logical possibility (Sections 2-3). Our practical reason, however, grounds belief in the real possibility of some noumena, and (...)
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  • Three Theses About Dispositions.Elizabeth Prior, Robert Pargetter & Frank Jackson - 1982 - American Philosophical Quarterly 19 (3):251-257.
    I. Causal Thesis: Dispositions have a causal basis. II. Distinctness Thesis: Dispositions are distinct from their causal basis. III. Impotence Thesis: Dispositions are not causally active.
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  • Kantian Humility: Our Ignorance of Things in Themselves.A. W. Moore - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):117-120.
    Kant once wrote, “Many historians of philosophy... let the philosophers speak mere nonsense.... They cannot see beyond what the philosophers actually said to what they really meant to say.’ Rae Langton begins her book with this quotation. She concludes it, after a final pithy summary of the position that she attributes to Kant, with the comment, “That, it seems to me, is what Kant said, and meant to say”. In between are some two hundred pages of admirably clear, tightly argued (...)
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  • Kant and the Claims of Knowledge.Paul GUYER - 1987 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book offers a radically new account of the development and structure of the central arguments of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason: the defense of the objective validity of such categories as substance, causation, and independent existence. Paul Guyer makes far more extensive use than any other commentator of historical materials from the years leading up to the publication of the Critique and surrounding its revision, and he shows that the work which has come down to us is the result (...)
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  • Kant’s Theory of Form: An Essay on the Critique of Pure Reason.Robert Pippin - 1982 - Yale University Press.
  • Kantian Humility: Our Ignorance of Things in Themselves.Rae Langton - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    Rae Langton offers a new interpretation and defense of Kant's doctrine of things in themselves. Kant distinguishes things in themselves from phenomena, and in so doing he makes a metaphysical distinction between intrinsic and relational properties of substances. Langton argues that his claim that we have no knowledge of things in themselves is not idealism, but epistemic humility: we have no knowledge of the intrinsic properties of substances. This interpretation vindicates Kant's scientific realism, and shows his primary/secondary quality distinction to (...)
  • Idealism and Freedom: Essays on Kant’s Theoretical and Practical Philosophy.Henry E. Allison - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    Henry Allison is one of the foremost interpreters of the philosophy of Kant. This new volume collects all his recent essays on Kant's theoretical and practical philosophy. All the essays postdate Allison's two major books on Kant, and together they constitute an attempt to respond to critics and to clarify, develop and apply some of the central theses of those books. Two are published here for the first time. Special features of the collection are: a detailed defence of the author's (...)
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  • Kant.Ralph Charles Sutherland Walker - 1978 - Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
     
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  • Causal Powers. A Theory of Natural Necessity.Rom Harré - 1975 - Rowman & Littlefield.
  • A Treatise on Time and Space.J. R. Lucas - 1973 - [London]Methuen.
  • Kant's Theory of Knowledge.Graham Bird - 1962 - New York: Humanities Press.
  • Intrinsic Properties and Natural Relations.John Hawthorne - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):399-403.
    Assuming that we find the concept of naturalness coherent, we shall no doubt wish to allow that certain relations count as highly natural. Many of us will think that various spatio-temporal and causal relations—is the cause of, is spatially separated from, is later than—are highly natural. Some of us will think that various basic semantic and mentalistic relations—refers to, attends to, believes.…--- are highly natural. Some will think that various logico-mathematical relations—being the successor of, being identical to…—are highly natural.
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  • Receptivity and Our Knowledge of Intrinsic Properties.James Van Cleve - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 65 (1):218-237.
    This is a marvelous book. Langton offers a fresh interpretation of Kant, the main tenets of which she states in a few bold propositions and then goes on to elaborate with great clarity and care. She supports her interpretation with a wealth of citations accompanied by insightful commentary. The “Humility” of her title is the thesis that we can have no knowledge of the intrinsic properties of things, which is Langton’s gloss on the Kantian slogan that we can have no (...)
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  • Problems From Kant.James Van Cleve - 1999 - Oup Usa.
    James Van Cleve examines the main topics from Kant's Critique of Pure Reason, such as transcendental idealism, necessity and analyticity, space and time, substance and cause, noumena and things-in-themselves, problems of the self, and rational theology. He also discusses the relationship between Kant's thought and that of modern anti-realists, such as Putnam and Dummett. Because Van Cleve focuses upon specific problems rather than upon entire passages or sections of the Critique, he makes Kant's work more accessible to the serious student (...)
  • Possible Experience: Understanding Kant's Critique of Pure Reason.Arthur Collins - 1999 - University of California Press.
    Arthur Collins's succinct, revisionist exposition of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason brings a new clarity to this notoriously difficult text.
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  • Mechanism, Superaddition and the Proof of God's Existence in Locke's Essays.Michael Ayers - 1981 - Philosophical Review 90 (2):210-251.
  • Representational Mind: A Study of Kant's Theory of Knowledge.Matter in Mind: A Study of Kant's Transcendental Deduction.Richard E. Aquila - 1983 - Philosophical Review 100 (4):703-710.
  • The Nature of the Physical World.Arthur Stanley Eddington - 1928 - London: Dent.
    1929. The course of Gifford Lectures that Eddington delivered in the University of Edinburgh in January to March 1927.
  • Maximality and Intrinsic Properties.Theodore Sider - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):357 - 364.
    A property, F, is maximal iff, roughly, large parts of an F are not themselves Fs.' Maximality makes trouble for a recent analysis of intrinsicality by Rae Langton and David Lewis.
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  • Dispositions and Conditionals.C. B. Martin - 1994 - Philosophical Quarterly 44 (174):1-8.
  • Mind, Brain, and the Quantum.Michael Lockwood - 1989 - Oxford University Press.
  • Langton on Things in Themselves: A Critique of Kantian Humility.Angela Breitenbach - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (1):137-148.
  • Intrinsic/Extrinsic.I. L. Humberstone - 1996 - Synthese 108 (2):205-267.
    Several intrinsic/extrinsic distinctions amongst properties, current in the literature, are discussed and contrasted. The proponents of such distinctions tend to present them as competing, but it is suggested here that at least three of the relevant distinctions (including here that between non-relational and relational properties) arise out of separate perfectly legitimate intuitive considerations: though of course different proposed explications of the informal distinctions involved in any one case may well conflict. Special attention is paid to the question of whether a (...)
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  • Marshall and Parsons on ‘Intrinsic’.David Lewis Rae Langton - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):353-355.
    Dan Marshall and Josh Parsons note, correctly, that the property of being either a cube or accompanied by a cube is incorrectly classified as intrinsic under the definition we have given unless it turns out to be disjunctive. Whether it is disjunctive, under the definition we gave, turns on certain judgements of the relative naturalness of properties. They doubt the judgements of relative naturalness that would classify their property as disjunctive. We disagree. They also suggest that the whole idea of (...)
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  • Putnam, Kant and Secondary Qualities.James Van Cleve - 1995 - Philosophical Papers 24 (2):83-109.
  • The Problems of Philosophy.Bertrand Russell - 1912 - Barnes & Noble.
    Immensely intelligible, thought-provoking guide by Nobel prize-winner considers such topics as the distinction between appearance and reality, the existence and nature of matter, idealism, inductive logic, intuitive knowledge, many other subjects. For students and general readers, there is no finer introduction to philosophy than this informative, affordable and highly readable edition that is "concise, free from technical terms, and perfectly clear to the general reader with no prior knowledge of the subject."—The Booklist of the American Library Association.
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  • Realism and Causation.Galen Strawson - 1987 - Philosophical Quarterly 37 (148):253-277.
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  • Kant's Transcendental Idealism.Henry E. Allison - 1988 - Yale University Press.
    This landmark book is now reissued in a new edition that has been vastly rewritten and updated to respond to recent Kantian literature.
  • The Semantics of 'Things in Themselves': A Deflationary Account.Frederick Kroon - 2001 - Philosophical Quarterly 51 (203):165-181.
    Kant's distinction between things in themselves and things as they appear, or appearances, is commonly attacked on the ground that it delivers a radical and incoherent ‘two world’ picture of what there is. I attempt to deflect this attack by questioning these terms of dismissal. Distinctions of the kind Kant draws on are in fact legion, and they make perfectly good sense. The way to make sense of them, however, is not by buying into a profligate ontology but by using (...)
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  • Matter and Sense: A Critique of Contemporary Materialism.Howard Robinson - 1982 - Cambridge University Press.
  • Langton on Things in Themselves.L. Falkenstein - 2001 - Kantian Review 5:49-64.
  • Real Materialism.Galen J. Strawson - 2003 - In Louise M. Antony (ed.), Chomsky and His Critics. Blackwell. pp. 49--88.
    (1) Materialists hold that every real, concrete phenomenon in the universe is a wholly physical phenomenon. (2) Consciousness ('what-it's-likeness', etc.) is the most certainly existing real, concrete phenomenon there is. It follows that (3) all serious materialists must grant that consciousness is a wholly physical phenomenon. ‘How can consciousness possibly be physical, given what we know about the physical?’ To ask this question is already to have gone wrong. We have no good reason (as Priestley, Eddington, Russell and others observe) (...)
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  • Superadded Properties: A Reply to M. R. Ayers.Margaret D. Wilson - 1982 - Philosophical Review 91 (2):247-252.
  • Kant's Empirical Realism.Paul Abela - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    Paul Abela presents a powerful, experience-sensitive form of realism about the relation between mind and world, based on an innovative interpretation of Kant. Abela breaks with tradition in taking seriously Kant's claim that his Transcendental Idealism yields a form of empirical realism, and giving a realist analysis of major themes of the Critique of Pure Reason. Abela's blending of Kantian scholarship with contemporary epistemology offers a new way of resolving philosophical debates about realism.
  • Cause and Mind.Sydney Shoemaker - 1984 - Cambridge University Press.
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  • The Bounds of Sense.P. F. Strawson - 1967 - Philosophy 42 (162):379-382.
  • The Case for Idealism.John A. Foster - 1982 - Routledge.
  • Kant's Analogies of Experience.Arthur Melnick - 1973 - Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Superadded Properties: The Limits of Mechanism in Locke.Margaret D. Wilson - 1979 - American Philosophical Quarterly 16 (2):143 - 150.
  • Recent Work on Kant's Theoretical Philosophy.Karl Ameriks - 1982 - American Philosophical Quarterly 19 (1):1 - 24.
  • Kant und das Problem der Dinge an sich.Gerold Prauss - 1976 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 30 (3):487-490.
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  • Reply to Evans.P. Strawson - 1980 - In Z. Van Straaten (ed.), Philosophical Subjects. Oxford University Press. pp. 273--282.
     
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