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  1. The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt.Maria Pia Lara - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (3):162-169.
  • Inessential Woman: Problems of Exclusion in Feminist Thought.Iris Marion Young - 1990 - Ethics 100 (4):898-900.
  • Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil.Hannah Arendt - 1964 - Science and Society 28 (2):223-227.
     
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  • The Power of Feminist Theory.Jana Sawicki - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):222-226.
  • Money, Sex and Power: Toward a Feminist Historical Materialism.Iris Marion Young - 1984 - Ethics 95 (1):162-164.
  • Power Trouble: Performativity as Critical Theory.Amy Allen - 1998 - Constellations 5 (4):456-471.
    Although Judith Butler’s theory of the performativity of gender has been highly influential in feminist theory, queer theory, cultural studies, and some areas of philosophy, it has yet to receive its due from critical social theorists. This oversight is especially problematic given the crucial insights into the study of power – a central concept for critical social theory – that can be gleaned from Butler’s work. Her analysis is somewhat unique among discussions of power in its attempt to theorize simultaneously (...)
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  • On Revolution.E. J. Hobsbawm & Hanna Arendt - 1965 - History and Theory 4 (2):252.
  • Hannah Arendt and the Limits of Philosophy.Lisa Jane Disch - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (3):164-168.
  • Contingent Foundations in Seyla Benhabib Et Al.Judith Butler - 1995 - In Seyla Benhabib (ed.), Feminist Contentions: A Philosophical Exchange. Routledge. pp. 35--58.
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  • Hannah Arendt, Feminism, and the Politics of Alterity: "What Will We Lose If We Win?".Joanne Cutting-Gray - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (1):35 - 54.
    Hannah Arendt's early biography of Rahel Varnhagen, an eighteenth-century German-Jew, provides a revolutionary feminist component to her political theory. In it, Arendt grapples with the theoretical constitution of a female subject and relates Jewish alterity, identity, and history to feminist politics. Because she understood the "female condition" of difference as belonging to the political subject rather than an autonomous self, her theory entails a "politics of alterity" with applications for feminist practice.
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  • Maternal Thinking: Toward a Politics of Peace.Sara Ruddick & Patricia Hill Collins - 1994 - Hypatia 9 (2):188-198.
    The most popular uniting theme in feminist peace literature grounds women's peace work in mothering. I argue if maternal arguments do not address the variety of relationships different races and classes of mothers have to institutional violence and/or the military, then the resulting peace politics can only draw incomplete conclusions about the relationships between maternal work/thinking and peace. To illustrate this I compare two models of mothering: Sara Ruddick's decription of "maternal practice" and Patricia Hill Collins's account of racial-ethnic women's (...)
     
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  • Gender Trouble: Feminism and the Subversion of Identity.Judith Butler & Suzanne Pharr - 1990 - Hypatia 5 (3):171-175.
  • Sacrificial Logics: Feminist Theory and the Critique of Identity.Allison Weir & Morwenna Griffith - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (1):120-125.
     
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  • Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt.Bonnie Honig - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (3):154-160.
    Feminist Interpretations of Hannah Arendt, edited by Bonnie Honig, a collection of critical feminist essays on Hannah Arendt, illustrates both the disorientation and the insights that can result when feminist philosophers come to terms with a canonical figure who is a woman.
     
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  • Hannah Arendt, Feminism, and the Politics of Alterity: “What Will We Lose If We Win?”.Joanne Cutting-Gray - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (1):35-54.
    Hannah Arendt's early biography of Rahel Varnhagen, an eighteenth-century German-Jew, provides a revolutionary feminist component to her political theory. In it, Arendt grapples with the theoretical constitution of a female subject and relates Jewish alterity, identity, and history to feminist politics. Because she understood the "female condition" of difference as belonging to the political subject rather than an autonomous self, her theory entails a "politics of alterity" with applications for feminist practice.
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