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  1. An Introduction to Plato's Laws.R. F. Stalley - 1983 - Hackett Pub. Co., C1983.
    Reading the _Republic_ without reference to the less familiar _Laws_ can lead to a distorted view of Plato's political theory. In the _Republic_ the philosopher describes his ideal city; in his last and longest work he deals with the more detailed considerations involved in setting up a second-best 'practical utopia.' The relative neglect of the _Laws_ has stemmed largely from the obscurity of its style and the apparent chaos of its organization so that, although good translations now exist, students of (...)
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  • Plato's Philosophers: The Coherence of the Dialogues.Catherine H. Zuckert - 2012 - University of Chicago Press.
    Faced with the difficult task of discerning Plato’s true ideas from the contradictory voices he used to express them, scholars have never fully made sense of the many incompatibilities within and between the dialogues. In the magisterial _Plato’s Philosophers_, Catherine Zuckert explains for the first time how these prose dramas cohere to reveal a comprehensive Platonic understanding of philosophy. To expose this coherence, Zuckert examines the dialogues not in their supposed order of composition but according to the dramatic order in (...)
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  • The Law Most Beautiful and Best: Medical Argument and Magical Rhetoric in Plato's Laws.Randall Baldwin Clark - 2003 - Lexington Books.
    The Law Most Beautiful and Best is a thoughtful and creative examination of the role irrational rhetoric ought to play in persuading citizens to voluntarily obey laws. Author Randall Baldwin Clark explores the figure of the physician in Plato's Laws to address this question, identifying the subtle ways in which Plato uses the physician's role in healing as a metaphor for the task of governance and arguing that Plato hints that rational discourse may ultimately be inadequate as a persuasive technique.
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  • The Laws.Trevor J. Plato & Saunders - 1970 - Epenguin.
    A dialogue between a foreign philosopher and a powerful statesman outlines in detail Plato's reflections on the family, the status of women, property rights, criminal law, and other institutions of society as he describes the day-to-day rule and laws of Magnesia, a small, mythical agricultural utopia. Reprint.
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  • The Laws of Plato.Thomas L. Pangle (ed.) - 1988 - University of Chicago Press.
    _The Laws_, Plato's longest dialogue, has for centuries been recognized as the most comprehensive exposition of the _practical_ consequences of his philosophy, a necessary corrective to the more visionary and utopian _Republic_. In this animated encounter between a foreign philosopher and a powerful statesman, not only do we see reflected, in Plato's own thought, eternal questions of the relation between political theory and practice, but we also witness the working out of a detailed plan for a new political order that (...)
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  • The Law Most Beautiful and Best: Medical Argument and Magical Rhetoric in Plato's Laws.Randall Baldwin Clark - 2003 - Lexington Books.
    The Law Most Beautiful and Best is a thoughtful and creative examination of the role irrational rhetoric ought to play in persuading citizens to voluntarily obey laws. Author Randall Baldwin Clark explores the figure of the physician in Plato's Laws to address this question, identifying the subtle ways in which Plato uses the physician's role in healing as a metaphor for the task of governance and arguing that Plato hints that rational discourse may ultimately be inadequate as a persuasive technique.
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  • Plato's Penal Code: Tradition, Controversy, and Reform in Greek Penology.J. Saunders Trevor - 1994 - Clarendon Press.
    This is a fascinating and important study of ideas of justice and punishment held by the ancient Greeks. The author traces the development of these ideas from Homer to Plato, analysing in particular the completely radical new system of punishment put forward by Plato in his dialogue the Laws. From traditional Greek ideas of cursing and pollution through to Plato's views on homicide and poisoning by doctors, this enlivening book has a wealth of insights to interest both ancient historians and (...)
     
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  • Plato's Philosophers: The Coherence of the Dialogues.Catherine H. Zuckert - 2009 - University of Chicago Press.
    Introduction: Platonic dramatology -- The political and philosophical problems. Using pre-Socratic philosophy to support political reform: the Athenian stranger ; Plato's Parmenides: Parmenides' critique of Socrates and Plato's critique of Parmenides ; Becoming Socrates ; Socrates interrogates his contemporaries about the noble and good -- Paradigms of philosophy. Socrates' positive teaching ; Timaeus-Critias: completing or challenging Socratic political philosophy? ; Socratic practice -- The trial and death of Socrates. The limits of human intelligence ; The Eleatic challenge ; The trial (...)
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  • Plato: Political Philosophy.Malcolm Schofield - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    Plato is the best known and most widely studied of all the ancient Greek philosophers. Malcolm Schofield, a leading scholar of ancient philosophy, offers a lucid and accessible guide to Plato's political thought, enormously influential and much discussed in the modern world as well as the ancient. Schofield discusses Plato's ideas on education, democracy and its shortcomings, the role of knowledge in government, utopia and the idea of community, money and its grip on the psyche, and ideological uses of religion.
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  • The Laws. Plato & Benjamin Jowett - 1970 - Harmondsworth, Penguin.
    "The Laws", Plato's most lengthy dialogue, has longbeen regarded as the most comprehensive explanation of the possible consequences of a practical application of his philosophy.We might expect the first question Plato ponders to be "What is Law?" Instead, the question posed is "Who is given the credit for laying down your laws?"We are privy to an interaction between a powerfulstatesman and an Athenian philosopher on theisland of Crete. We watch as a plan for a new political order is worked out (...)
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  • Plato's Cretan City: A Historical Interpretation of the Laws.Glenn R. Morrow - 1960 - Princeton University Press.
    Plato's Cretan City is a thorough investigation into the roots of Plato's Laws and a compelling explication of his ideas on legislation and social institutions. A dialogue among three travelers, the Laws proposes a detailed plan for administering a new colony on the island of Crete. In examining this dialogue, Glenn Morrow describes the contemporary Greek institutions in Athens, Crete, and Sparta on which Plato based his model city, and explores the philosopher's proposed regulations concerning property, the family, government, and (...)
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  • Plato's Noble Lie: From Kallipolis to Magnesia.David Williams - 2013 - History of Political Thought 34 (3):363-392.
    The tradition of the political lie infamously commences with Platos Noble Lie in the Republic. It is woven with great care into his utopian state on the premise that Philosopher-Rulers are incorruptible wielders of political power.Most treatments of the Noble Lie understand this and then proceed to dismiss Plato on the basis of his unrealistic assumptions about human nature. But when consideration is extended to the Laws, one finds a far more nuanced and relevant Plato uncomfortable with the > practice (...)
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  • Republic 382a-D: On the Dangers and Benefits of Falsehood.Nicholas R. Baima - 2017 - Classical Philology 112 (1):1-19.
    Socrates' attitude towards falsehood is quite puzzling in the Republic. Although Socrates is clearly committed to truth, at several points he discusses the benefits of falsehood. This occurs most notably in Book 3 with the "noble lie" (414d-415c) and most disturbingly in Book 5 with the "rigged sexual lottery" (459d-460c). This raises the question: What kinds of falsehoods does Socrates think are beneficial, and what kinds of falsehoods does he think are harmful? And more broadly: What can this tell us (...)
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  • Plato Laws 10.Robert Mayhew - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):437-441.
  • The Greeks and the Irrational.E. R. Dodds - 1951 - Philosophy 28 (105):176-177.
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  • Minding the Gap in Plato's Republic.Eric Brown - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 117 (1-2):275-302.
    At least since Sachs' well-known essay, readers of Plato's Republic have worried that there is a gap between the challenge posed to Socrates--to show that it is always in one's interest to act justly--and his response--to show that it is always in one's interest to have a just soul. The most popular response has been that Socrates fills this gap in Books Five through Seven by supposing that knowledge of the Forms motivates those with just souls to act justly. I (...)
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  • An Introduction to Plato's Laws.Richard Kraut - 1985 - Philosophical Review 94 (1):123-127.
  • Plato's Conception of Persuasion.Glenn R. Morrow - 1953 - Philosophical Review 62 (2):234-250.
  • Death and the Limits of Truth in the Phaedo.Nicholas Baima - 2015 - Apeiron 48 (3):263-284.
    This paper raises a new interpretive puzzle concerning Socrates’ attitude towards truth in the Phaedo. At one point Socrates seems to advocate that he is justified in trying to convince himself that the soul is immortal and destined for a better place regardless of whether or not these claims are true, but that Cebes and Simmias should relentlessly pursue the truth about the very same matter. This raises the question: Why might Socrates believe that he will benefit from believing things (...)
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  • Legislation and Demiurgy: On the Relationship Between Plato's "Republic" and "Laws".André Laks - 1990 - Classical Antiquity 9 (2):209-229.
  • Tēn Tou Aristou Doxan: On the Theory and Practice of Punishment in Plato’s Laws.Lewis Trelawny-Cassity - 2010 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 27 (2):222-239.
    The penal code of the Laws has attracted scholarly attention because it appears to advance a coherent theory of punishment. The Laws' suggestion that legislation follow the model of 'free doctors', as well as its discussion of the Socratic paradox, leads one to expect a theory of punishment that recommends kolasis and nouthetesis rather than timoria. In practice, however, the Laws makes use of the language of timoria and categorizes some crimes as voluntary. While the Laws provides a searching criticism (...)
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  • Γενουστησ.John Burnet - 1900 - The Classical Review 14 (08):393-394.
  • The Greeks and the Irrational. By E. R. Dodds. Pp. Ix + 327. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press , 1951. 37s. 6d. [REVIEW]H. J. Rose & E. R. Dodds - 1953 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 73 (105):176-177.
    In this philosophy classic, which was first published in 1951, E. R. Dodds takes on the traditional view of Greek culture as a triumph of rationalism. Using the analytical tools of modern anthropology and psychology, Dodds asks, "Why should we attribute to the ancient Greeks an immunity from 'primitive' modes of thought which we do not find in any society open to our direct observation?" Praised by reviewers as "an event in modern Greek scholarship" and "a book which it would (...)
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  • Taming Democracy: Models of Political Rhetoric in Classical Athens. [REVIEW]Jon Hesk & H. Yunis - 1999 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 119:183-183.
  • An Introduction to Plato's Laws.R. F. Stalley - 1985 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 47 (4):681-681.
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  • The Open Society and its Enemies.Karl R. Popper - 1952 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 142:629-634.
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  • Plato's Penal Code. Tradition, Controversy, and Reform in Greek Penology.Trevor J. Saunders - 1993 - Utopian Studies 4 (1):190-191.
  • The Open Society and Its Enemies.Karl R. Popper - 1955 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 6 (22):164-169.
     
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  • Plato: Political Philosopher.Malcolm Schofield - 2009 - Political Theory 37 (1):181-185.