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  1. Psychology of Feelings and Emotions: I. Theory of Feelings.H. F. Harlow & R. Stagner - 1932 - Psychological Review 39 (6):570-589.
  • Emotional Behaviors, Emotivational Goals, Emotion Strategies: Multiple Levels of Organization Integrate Variable and Consistent Responses.Ira J. Roseman - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):434-443.
    Researchers have found undeniable variability and irrefutable evidence of consistencies in emotional responses across situations, individuals, and cultures. Both must be acknowledged in constructing adequate, enduring models of emotional phenomena. In this article I outline an empirically-grounded model of the structure of the emotion system, in which relatively variable actions may be used to pursue relatively consistent goals within discrete emotion syndromes; the syndromes form a stable, coherent set of strategies for coping with crises and opportunities. I also discuss a (...)
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  • Core Affect and the Psychological Construction of Emotion.James A. Russell - 2003 - Psychological Review 110 (1):145-172.
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  • Language as Context for the Perception of Emotion.Maria Gendron Lisa Feldman Barrett, Kristen A. Lindquist - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):327.
  • Reconstructing the Past: A Century of Ideas About Emotion in Psychology.Maria Gendron & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (4):316.
    Within the discipline of psychology, the conventional history outlines the development of two fundamental approaches to the scientific study of emotion—“basic emotion” and “appraisal” traditions. In this article, we outline the development of a third approach to emotion that exists in the psychological literature—the “psychological constructionist” tradition. In the process, we discuss a number of works that have virtually disappeared from the citation trail in psychological discussions of emotion. We also correct some misconceptions about early sources, such as work by (...)
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  • A Functional Architecture of the Human Brain: Emerging Insights From the Science of Emotion.Kristen A. Lindquist & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (11):533-540.
  • Psychological Construction in the OCC Model of Emotion.Gerald L. Clore & Andrew Ortony - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (4):335-343.
    This article presents six ideas about the construction of emotion: (a) Emotions are more readily distinguished by the situations they signify than by patterns of bodily responses; (b) emotions emerge from, rather than cause, emotional thoughts, feelings, and expressions; (c) the impact of emotions is constrained by the nature of the situations they represent; (d) in the OCC account (the model proposed by Ortony, Clore, and Collins in 1988), appraisals are psychological aspects of situations that distinguish one emotion from another, (...)
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  • Words (but Not Tones) Facilitate Object Categorization: Evidence From 6- and 12-Month-Olds.Sandra R. Waxman Anne L. Fulkerson - 2007 - Cognition 105 (1):218.
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  • Attitudes and Evaluations: A Social Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective.William A. Cunningham & Philip David Zelazo - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):97-104.
  • Cognitive, Social, and Physiological Determinants of Emotional State.Stanley Schachter & Jerome Singer - 1962 - Psychological Review 69 (5):379-399.
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  • Emotions Emerge From More Basic Psychological Ingredients: A Modern Psychological Constructionist Model.Kristen A. Lindquist - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (4):356-368.
    Over a century ago, William James outlined the first psychological constructionist model of emotion, arguing that emotions are phenomena constructed of more basic psychological parts. In this article, I outline a modern psychological constructionist model of emotion. I first explore the history of psychological construction to demonstrate that psychological constructionist models have historically emerged in an attempt to explain variability in emotion that cannot be accounted for by other approaches. I next discuss the modern psychological constructionist model of emotion that (...)
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  • Labels Can Override Perceptual Categories in Early Infancy.Kim Plunkett, Jon-Fan Hu & Leslie B. Cohen - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):665-681.
  • What's Basic About Basic Emotions?Andrew Ortony & Terence J. Turner - 1990 - Psychological Review 97 (3):315-331.
  • Emergent Ghosts of the Emotion Machine.James A. Coan - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (3):274-285.
    Competing perspectives on the nature of emotion are illustrated with latent and emergent variable models. Latent variable models draw from classical test theory, assuming that the measured indicators of emotion covary by virtue of some common executive, organizing neural circuit or network in the brain. By contrast, emergent variable models draw from a theory-driven, operational definition tradition, positing that emotions do not cause, but rather are caused by, the measured indicators of emotion, assuming no executive neural circuit or network, and (...)
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  • Emotional States From Affective Dynamics.William A. Cunningham, Kristen A. Dunfield & Paul E. Stillman - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (4):344-355.
    Psychological constructivist models of emotion propose that emotions arise from the combinations of multiple processes, many of which are not emotion specific. These models attempt to describe both the homogeneity of instances of an emotional “kind” (why are fears similar?) and the heterogeneity of instances (why are different fears quite different?). In this article, we review the iterative reprocessing model of affect, and suggest that emotions, at least in part, arise from the processing of dynamical unfolding representations of valence across (...)
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  • What is Meant by Calling Emotions Basic.Paul Ekman & Daniel Cordaro - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):364-370.
    Emotions are discrete, automatic responses to universally shared, culture-specific and individual-specific events. The emotion terms, such as anger, fear, etcetera, denote a family of related states sharing at least 12 characteristics, which distinguish one emotion family from another, as well as from other affective states. These affective responses are preprogrammed and involuntary, but are also shaped by life experiences.
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  • Words Facilitate Object Categorization: Evidence From 6- and 12-Month-Olds.Anne L. Fulkerson & Sandra R. Waxman - 2007 - Cognition 105 (1):218-228.
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  • Language as Context for the Perception of Emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett, Kristen A. Lindquist & Maria Gendron - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (8):327-332.
  • Reconstructing the Past: A Century of Ideas About Emotion in Psychology.Maria Gendron & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (4):316-339.
    Within the discipline of psychology, the conventional history outlines the development of two fundamental approaches to the scientific study of emotion—“basic emotion” and “appraisal” traditions. In this article, we outline the development of a third approach to emotion that exists in the psychological literature—the “psychological constructionist” tradition. In the process, we discuss a number of works that have virtually disappeared from the citation trail in psychological discussions of emotion. We also correct some misconceptions about early sources, such as work by (...)
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  • Emotion Generation and Emotion Regulation: One or Two Depends on Your Point of View.James J. Gross & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (1):8-16.
    Emotion regulation has the odd distinction of being a wildly popular construct whose scientific existence is in considerable doubt. In this article, we discuss the confusion about whether emotion generation and emotion regulation can and should be distinguished from one another. We describe a continuum of perspectives on emotion, and highlight how different (often mutually incompatible) perspectives on emotion lead to different views about whether emotion generation and emotion regulation can be usefully distinguished. We argue that making differences in perspective (...)
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  • The Construction of Emotion in Interactions, Relationships, and Cultures.Michael Boiger & Batja Mesquita - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (3):221-229.
    Emotions are engagements with a continuously changing world of social relationships. In the present article, we propose that emotions are therefore best conceived as ongoing, dynamic, and interactive processes that are socially constructed. We review evidence for three social contexts of emotion construction that are embedded in each other: The unfolding of emotion within interactions, the mutual constitution of emotion and relationships, and the shaping of emotion at the level of the larger cultural context. Finally, we point to interdependencies amongst (...)
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  • An Argument for Basic Emotions.Paul Ekman - 1992 - Cognition and Emotion 6 (3-4):169-200.
  • The Triple Helix: Gene, Organism, and Environment.Richard Lewontin - 2000 - Journal of the History of Biology 33 (3):611-612.
     
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  • The Psychological Significance of the Concept of "Arousal" or "Activation.".Elizabeth Duffy - 1957 - Psychological Review 64 (5):265-275.
  • Intelligent Emotion Regulation.Tanja Wranik, Lisa Feldman Barrett & Peter Salovey - 2007 - In James J. Gross (ed.), Handbook of Emotion Regulation. Guilford Press.
  • Appraisal Determinants of Discrete Emotions.Ira J. Roseman - 1991 - Cognition and Emotion 5 (3):161-200.
  • The Dynamic Architecture of Emotion: Evidence for the Component Process Model.Klaus R. Scherer - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1307-1351.
  • Individual Differences in Patterns of Appraisal and Anger Experience.Peter Kuppens, Iven Van Mechelen, Dirk Jm Smits, Paul De Boeck & Eva Ceulemans - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (4):689-713.