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  1. Drawing the Line: Mapping Cultivated Plants and Seeing Nature in Nineteenth-Century Plant Geography.Nils Güttler - 2015 - In Sharon Kingsland & Denise Phillips (eds.), New Perspectives on the History of Life Sciences and Agriculture. Springer Verlag.
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  • An Introduction to Discourse Analysis: Theory and Method.[author unknown] - 2011
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  • Scientists and the Cultural Politics of Academic Disciplines in Late 19th-Century Germany: Emil Du Bois-Reymond and the Controversy Over the Role of the Cultural Sciences.Irmline Veit-Brause - 2001 - History of the Human Sciences 14 (4):31-56.
    This article is concerned with interactions between the natural and the human sciences. It examines a specific late 19th-century episode in their relationship and argues that the schism between the two branches of knowledge was due to cognitive factors, but consolidated through the social dynamics of institutionalized disciplines. It contends that the assignment of a social function to the human sciences to compensate for the self-destructive tendencies inherent in the technological society was expressed even by those, at the end of (...)
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  • The Making of Modern Scientific Personae: The Scientist as a Moral Person? Emil Du Bois-Reymond and His Friends.Irmline Veit-Brause - 2002 - History of the Human Sciences 15 (4):19-49.
    This article examines the notion of the `scientist as a moral person' in the light of the early stages of the commodification of science and the transformation of research into a big enterprise, operating on the principle of the division of labour. These processes were set in train at the end of the 19th century. The article focuses on the concomitant changes in the public persona and the habitus of scientific entrepreneurs. I begin by showing the significance of the professional (...)
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  • Tycho Brahe and the Separation of Astronomy From Astrology: The Making of a New Scientific Discourse.Gábor Almási - 2013 - Science in Context 26 (1):3-30.
    ArgumentThe subject of the paper is the shift from an astrology-oriented astronomy towards an allegedly more objective, mathematically grounded approach to astronomy. This shift is illustrated through a close reading of Tycho Brahe's scientific development and the contemporaneous changes in his communicational strategies. Basing the argument on a substantial array of original sources it is claimed that the Danish astronomer developed a new astronomical discourse in pursuit of credibility, giving priority to observational astronomy and natural philosophical questions. The abandonment of (...)
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  • Apollo’s Tragedy: Laboratory Science Between Classicism and Industrial Modernism.Sven Dierig - 2010 - In Moritz Epple & Claus Zittel (eds.), Science as Cultural Practice. Akademie Verlag. pp. 103-120.
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  • A Social History of Truth: Civility and Science in Seventeenth-Century England by Steven Shapin. [REVIEW]Lorraine Daston - 1995 - Journal of Philosophy 92 (7):388-392.
  • On the Professorial Voice.William Clark - 2003 - Science in Context 16 (1-2):43-57.
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  • ‘Nature’ in the Laboratory: Domestication and Discipline with the Microscope in Victorian Life Science.Graeme Gooday - 1991 - British Journal for the History of Science 24 (3):307-341.
    What sort of activities took place in the academic laboratories developed for teaching the natural sciences in Britain between the 1860s and 1880s? What kind of social and instrumental regimes were implemented to make them meaningful and efficient venues of experimental instruction? As humanly constructed sites of experiment how were the metropolitan institutional contexts of these laboratories engineered to make them legitimate places to study ‘Nature’? Previous studies have documented chemists' effective use of regimented quantitative analysis in their laboratory teaching (...)
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  • Introduction: Scientific Personae and Their Histories.Lorraine Daston & H. Otto Sibum - 2003 - Science in Context 16 (1-2):1-8.
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  • Judith Rich Harris: The Miss Marple of Developmental Psychology.Elisabeth Wesseling - 2004 - Science in Context 17 (3):293-314.
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  • Pictures, Preparations, and Living Processes: The Production of Immediate Visual Perception (Anschauung) in Late-19th-Century Physiology. [REVIEW]Henning Schmidgen - 2004 - Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):477 - 513.
    This paper addresses the visual culture of late-19th-century experimental physiology. Taking the case of Johann Nepomuk Czermak (1828-1873) as a key example, it argues that images played a crucial role in acquiring experimental physiological skills. Czermak, Emil Du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896) and other late-19th-century physiologists sought to present the achievements and perspective of their discipline by way of "immediate visual perception (unmittelbare Anschauung)." However, the images they produced and presented for this purpose were strongly mediated. By means of specifically designed instruments, (...)
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  • Knowledge in Transit.James A. Secord - 2004 - Isis 95 (4):654-672.
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  • Knowledge in Transit.James Secord - 2004 - Isis 95:654-672.
    What big questions and large‐scale narratives give coherence to the history of science? From the late 1970s onward, the field has been transformed through a stress on practice and fresh perspectives from gender studies, the sociology of knowledge, and work on a greatly expanded range of practitioners and cultures. Yet these developments, although long overdue and clearly beneficial, have been accompanied by fragmentation and loss of direction. This essay suggests that the narrative frameworks used by historians of science need to (...)
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  • Pictures, Preparations, and Living Processes: The Production of Immediate Visual Perception in Late-19th-Century Physiology.Henning Schmidgen - 2004 - Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):477-513.
    This paper addresses the visual culture of late-19th-century experimental physiology. Taking the case of Johann Nepomuk Czermak as a key example, it argues that images played a crucial role in acquiring experimental physiological skills. Czermak, Emil Du Bois-Reymond and other late-19th-century physiologists sought to present the achievements and perspective of their discipline by way of "immediate visual perception." However, the images they produced and presented for this purpose were strongly mediated. By means of specifically designed instruments, such as the "cardioscope," (...)
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  • Voltaire.J. B. Shank - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  • Historical Reflections on Classical Pyrrhonism and Neo-Pyrrhonism.Gisela Striker - 2004 - In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Pyrrhonian Skepticism. Oxford University Press. pp. 13--24.
    This essay argues that ancient Pyrrhonists did not decide to suspend judgment, but rather claimed to have found themselves unable to arrive at any judgment. By giving up the attempt, they also claimed to have unexpectedly reached tranquility, then followed the customs of ordinary life without ever claiming to have found the truth. This anti-rational attitude is not likely to be typical of ordinary people, nor would it seem desirable to modern defenders of ordinary practices like Fogelin.
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  • The Limits of Our Knowledge of Nature.Emil du Bois-Reymond - 1874 - The Popular Science Monthly 5:17-32.
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