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There Is No Wild

Society and Animals 23 (5):462-483 (2015)

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  1. Wild Justice and Fair Play: Cooperation, Forgiveness, and Morality in Animals. [REVIEW]Marc Bekoff - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (4):489-520.
    In this paper I argue that we can learn much about wild justice and the evolutionary origins of social morality – behaving fairly – by studying social play behavior in group-living animals, and that interdisciplinary cooperation will help immensely. In our efforts to learn more about the evolution of morality we need to broaden our comparative research to include animals other than non-human primates. If one is a good Darwinian, it is premature to claim that only humans can be empathic (...)
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  • Do Zoos and Aquariums Promote Attitude Change in Visitors? A Critical Evaluation of the American Zoo and Aquarium Study.Randy Malamud, Lori Marino, Nathan Nobis, Ron Broglio & Scott O. Lilienfeld - 2010 - Society and Animals 18 (2):126-138.
    Modern-day zoos and aquariums market themselves as places of education and conservation. A recent study conducted by the American Zoo and Aquarium Association is being widely heralded as the first direct evidence that visits to zoos and aquariums produce long-term positive effects on people’s attitudes toward other animals. In this paper, we address whether this conclusion is warranted by analyzing the study’s methodological soundness. We conclude that Falk et al. contains at least six major threats to methodological validity that undermine (...)
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  • Language, Power and the Social Construction of Animals.Arran Stibbe - 2001 - Society and Animals 9 (2):145-161.
    This paper describes how language contributes to the oppression and exploitation of animals by animal product industries. Critical Discourse Analysis, a framework usually applied in countering racism and sexism, is applied to a corpus of texts taken from animal industry sources. The mass confinement and slaughter of animals in intensive farms depend on the implicit consent of the population, signaled by its willingness to buy animal products produced in this way. Ideological assumptions embedded in everyday discourse and that of the (...)
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  • Animals and the Discourse of Farming in Southern Africa.Les Mitchell - 2006 - Society and Animals 14 (1):39-59.
    This paper looks at discourses related to animal farming in a popular South African farming magazine. The paper analyzes four ar ticles using a form of Critical Discourse Analysis . Despite varying widely in content and style, all articles draw from the discourses of production and science; two also show a minor discourse of achievement. With further work, it is possible to discern a fourth, deeply embedded discourse: that of enslavement. This also was present in all the articles. These discourses (...)
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  • Kiwis Against Possums: A Critical Analysis of Anti-Possum Rhetoric in Aotearoa New Zealand.Annie Potts - 2009 - Society and Animals 17 (1):1-20.
    The history of brushtail possums in New Zealand is bleak. The colonists who forcibly transported possums from their native Australia to New Zealand in the nineteenth century valued them as economic assets, quickly establishing a profitable fur industry. Over the past 80 or so years, however, New Zealand has increasingly scapegoated possums for the unanticipated negative impact their presence has had on the native environment and wildlife. Now this marsupial—blamed and despised—suffers the most miserable of reputations and is extensively targeted (...)
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  • A Linguistic Analysis of Discourse on the Killing of Nonhuman Animals.Jill Jepson - 2008 - Society and Animals 16 (2):127-148.
    Human attitudes about killing nonhuman animals are complex, ambivalent, and contradictory. This study attempts to elucidate those attitudes through a linguistic analysis of the terms used to refer to the killing of animals. Whereas terms used for killing human beings are highly specific and differentiated on the basis of the motivation for the killing, the nature of the participants, and evaluative and emotional content, terms used for killing animals are vague and interchangeable. Terms for animal-killing often background aspects of the (...)
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  • Deep Ecology and Language: The Curtailed Journey of the Atlantic Salmon.Arran Stibbe - 2006 - Society and Animals 14 (1):61-77.
    This article explores the representation of fish in ecological discourse through analysis of the recently published Millennium Ecosystem Assessment synthesis report. The analysis utilizes an ecological framework based on "deep ecology" , examining how the discourse of the MA asserts or denies the intrinsic worth of fish. The discursive construction of fish is particularly relevant given the massive expansion of the aquaculture industry, which is having a negative impact on ecosystems and the fish themselves, particularly the Atlantic salmon. There are (...)
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  • In the Eye of the Beholder: Changing Social Perceptions of the Florida Manatee.Theresa Goedeke - 2004 - Society and Animals 12 (2):99-116.
    Little understood in early U.S. history, the Florida manatee suffered at the hands of people. After the manatees were listed as endangered, scientists began to study manatees and gained much knowledge about them. With education efforts, the species then went from inspiring acts of cruelty to inspiring dedication and admiration among scientists, policymakers, and the interested public. The image of the manatee underwent a transformation. The social and cultural reinvention of the Florida manatees improved their chances for protection.
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  • As Charming as a Pig:The Discursive Construction of the Relationship Between Pigs and Humans.Arran Stibbe - 2003 - Society and Animals 11 (4):375-392.
    In the past, pigs were kept near their guardians' homes, ate leftovers from their guardians' kitchens and enjoyed a generally close relationship with humans. The closeness of the relationship, combined with its ultimate end in the killing of the pig, led to a sense of shame . This shame manifested itself in negative expressions about pigs within the English language, which remain to this day. However, the relationship between humans and pigs is becoming increasingly distant, with decisions affecting pigs' lives (...)
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  • Anthropomorphism and Anecdotes: A Guide for the Perplexed.Robert W. Mitchell - 1997 - In R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.), Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals. Suny Press. pp. 407--427.
  • The Discursive Construction of Anthropocentrism.Rita Turner - 2009 - Environmental Ethics 31 (2):183-201.
    Our businesses, policies, and lifestyles cause unexamined consequences for other people and other living beings, and exact sweeping destruction on the very ecosystems which support all life, including our own. A major factor contributing to this destructive behavior is the anthropocentric character of the dominant Western world view, which conceives of the nonhuman living world as apart from and less important than the human world, and which conceptualizes nonhuman nature—including animals, plants, ecological systems, the land, and the atmosphere—as inert, silent, (...)
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  • Reading Zoos: Representations of Animals and Captivity.Randy Malamud - 1998 - New York University Press.
    A caged animal in the heart of the city, thousands of miles from its natural habitat, neurotically pacing in its confinement . . . Zoos offer a convenient way to indulge a cultural appetite for novelty and diversion, and to teach us, albeit superficially, about animals. Yet what, conversely, do they tell us about the people who create, maintain, and patronize them, and about animal captivity in general? Rather than foster an appreciation for the lives and attributes of animals, zoos, (...)
     
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  • The Rose Tinted Menagerie.William Johnson & Marthe Kiley-Worthington - 1992 - Environmental Values 1 (2):175-176.
     
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  • Animal Equality: Language and Liberation.Joan Dunayer - 2003 - Environmental Values 12 (3):400-402.
     
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  • Anthropomorphism, Anecdotes, and Animals.R. Mitchell, Nicholas S. Thompson & H. L. Miles (eds.) - 1997 - SUNY Press.
    This is the first book to evaluate the significance and usefulness of the practices of anthropomorphism and anecdotalism for understanding animals.
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  • Why Circuses Are Unsuited to Elephants.Lori Alward - 2008 - In Christen M. Wemmer & Catherine A. Christen (eds.), Elephants and Ethics: Toward a Morality of Coexistence. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 205.
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  • View From the Big Top : Why Elephants Belong in North American Circuses.Dennis Schmitt - 2008 - In Christen M. Wemmer & Catherine A. Christen (eds.), Elephants and Ethics: Toward a Morality of Coexistence. Johns Hopkins University Press.
     
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  • 11 View From the Big Top.Why Elephants Belong & Dennis Schmitt - 2008 - In Christen M. Wemmer & Catherine A. Christen (eds.), Elephants and Ethics: Toward a Morality of Coexistence. Johns Hopkins University Press.
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