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  1. Forms and Functions of Emotions: Matters of Emotion–Cognition Interactions.Carroll E. Izard - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):371-378.
    This article clarifies my current and seemingly ever-changing position on issues relating to emotions. The position derives from my differential emotions theory and it changes with new empirical findings and with insights from my own and others’ thinking and writing. The theory distinguishes between first-order emotions and emotion schemas. For example, it proposes that first-order negative emotions are attributable mainly to infants and young children in distress and to older individuals in emergency or highly challenging situations. Emotion schemas are defined (...)
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  • Kick the Cat: A Serial Crossover Effect of Supervisors’ Ego Depletion on Subordinates’ Deviant Behavior.Xiaodong Ming, Xinwen Bai & Lin Lin - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  • Adequacy of the Sequential-Task Paradigm in Evoking Ego-Depletion and How to Improve Detection of Ego-Depleting Phenomena.Nick Lee, Nikos Chatzisarantis & Martin S. Hagger - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  • Is Learning With Elaborative Interrogation Less Desirable When Learners Are Depleted?Tim Kühl & Alex Bertrams - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • The Central Governor Model of Exercise Regulation Teaches Us Precious Little About the Nature of Mental Fatigue and Self-Control Failure.Michael Inzlicht & Samuele M. Marcora - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  • Creative Flexibility Performance Is Neither Related to Anxiety, Nor to Self-Control Strength, Nor to Their Interaction.Alex Bertrams & Chris Englert - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Embodiment in Social Psychology.Brian P. Meier, Simone Schnall, Norbert Schwarz & John A. Bargh - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):705-716.
    Psychologists are increasingly interested in embodiment based on the assumption that thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are grounded in bodily interaction with the environment. We examine how embodiment is used in social psychology, and we explore the ways in which embodied approaches enrich traditional theories. Although research in this area is burgeoning, much of it has been more descriptive than explanatory. We provide a critical discussion of the trajectory of embodiment research in social psychology. We contend that future researchers should engage (...)
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  • Conscious Intrusion of Threat Information Via Unconscious Priming in Anxiety.Wen Li, Ken A. Paller & Richard E. Zinbarg - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (1):44-62.
  • An Opportunity Cost Model of Subjective Effort and Task Performance.Robert Kurzban, Angela Duckworth, Joseph W. Kable & Justus Myers - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):661-679.
    Why does performing certain tasks cause the aversive experience of mental effort and concomitant deterioration in task performance? One explanation posits a physical resource that is depleted over time. We propose an alternative explanation that centers on mental representations of the costs and benefits associated with task performance. Specifically, certain computational mechanisms, especially those associated with executive function, can be deployed for only a limited number of simultaneous tasks at any given moment. Consequently, the deployment of these computational mechanisms carries (...)
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  • A Series of Meta-Analytic Tests of the Depletion Effect: Self-Control Does Not Seem to Rely on a Limited Resource.Evan C. Carter, Lilly M. Kofler, Daniel E. Forster & Michael E. McCullough - 2015 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 144 (4):796-815.
  • When Do I Wear Me Out? Mental Simulation and the Diminution of Self-Control.C. Neil Macrae, Brittany M. Christian, Marius Golubickis, Magdalene Karanasiou, Lenka Troksiarova, Diana L. McNamara & Lynden K. Miles - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (4):1755-1764.
  • Attention Control, Memory Updating, and Emotion Regulation Temporarily Reduce the Capacity for Executive Control.Brandon J. Schmeichel - 2007 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 136 (2):241-255.
  • The Sweetness of Surrender: Glucose Enhances Self-Control by Signaling Environmental Richness.Neil Levy - 2016 - Philosophical Psychology 29 (6):813-825.
    According to the ego-depletion account of loss of self-control, self-control is, or depends on, a depletable resource. Advocates of this account have argued that what is depleted is actually glucose. However, there is experimental evidence that indicates that glucose replenishment is not necessary for regaining self-control, as well as theoretical reasons for thinking that it is not depleted by exercises of self-control. I suggest that glucose restores self-control not because it is a resource on which it relies, but because it (...)
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  • Why Self-Control Seems Limited.Michael Inzlicht, Brandon J. Schmeichel & C. Neil Macrae - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (3):127-133.
  • The Relationship of Emotion to Cognition: A Functional Approach to a Semantic Controversy.Howard Leventhal & Klaus Scherer - 1987 - Cognition and Emotion 1 (1):3-28.