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  1. On Justification: Economies of Worth.Luc Boltanski & Laurent Thévenot - 2006 - Princeton University Press.
    A vital and underappreciated dimension of social interaction is the way individuals justify their actions to others, instinctively drawing on their experience to appeal to principles they hope will command respect. Individuals, however, often misread situations, and many disagreements can be explained by people appealing, knowingly and unknowingly, to different principles. On Justification is the first English translation of Luc Boltanski and Laurent Thévenot's ambitious theoretical examination of these phenomena, a book that has already had a huge impact on French (...)
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  • Collective Social Entrepreneurship: Collaboratively Shaping Social Good. [REVIEW]A. Wren Montgomery, Peter A. Dacin & M. Tina Dacin - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):375-388.
    In this paper, we move beyond the typical focus on the role of individuals in leading social change to examine "collective social entrepreneurship", the role multiple actors collaboratively play to address social problems, create new institutions, and dismantle outdated institutional arrangements. Specifically, we examine collective social entrepreneurship across a diverse range of collaborative activities including movements, alliances and markets for social good. We identify resource utilization approaches and three associated sets of activities that illustrate the work of collective social entrepreneurs—framing, (...)
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  • A Tale of Two Cultures: Charity, Problem Solving, and the Future of Social Entrepreneurship. [REVIEW]J. Gregory Dees - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):321-334.
    Two cultures are at play in the field of social entrepreneurship: an age-old culture of charity, and a more contemporary culture of entrepreneurial problem solving. These cultures permeate activities from resource providers to front line operations. Both have roots in our psychological responses to the needs of others and are reinforced by social norms. They can work hand-in-hand or they can be at odds. Some of the icons of the social entrepreneurship movement have spoken harshly about charity, yet most of (...)
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  • Discourse Theory and Business Ethics. The Case of Bankers' Conceptualizations of Customers.Gjalt de Graaf - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 31 (4):299-319.
    Within discourse theory, language is seen as constitutive of reality. Furthermore, facts and values are viewed as inseparable. This has consequences for business ethics. In this paper the relationship between discourse theory and business ethics is discussed. Both the descriptive and prescriptive aspects of business ethics are taken into account. Furthermore, an example of an empirical study is presented. A discourse analysis is conducted to answer the questions of how bankers in Holland conceptualize and thus treat their customers and whether (...)
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  • A Positive Theory of Social Entrepreneurship.Filipe M. Santos - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):335-351.
    I propose a theory aimed at advancing scholarly research in social entrepreneurship. By highlighting the key trade-off between value creation and value capture and explaining when situations of simultaneous market and government failure may arise, I suggest that social entrepreneurship is the pursuit of sustainable solutions to neglected problems with positive externalities. I further discuss the situations in which problems with externalities are likely to be neglected and derive the central goal and logic of action of social entrepreneurs, in contrast (...)
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  • The Moderating Effect of Environmental Munificence and Dynamism on the Relationship Between Discretionary Social Responsibility and Firm Performance.Irene Goll & Abdul A. Rasheed - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 49 (1):41-54.
    This study examines the relationships between a company''s emphasis on discretionary social responsibility, environment, and firm performance. It tests the proposition that environmental munificence and dynamism moderate the relationship between discretionary social responsibility and financial performance. Social responsibility was measured with a three-item scale in a sample of 62 firms using a questionnaire. Environmental munificence and dynamism were measured using archival sources as was financial performance (return on assets and return on sales). The results of moderated regression analyses and subgroup (...)
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  • Social Entrepreneurship: The Role of Institutions.Mukesh Sud, Craig V. VanSandt & Amanda M. Baugous - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S1):201 - 216.
    A relatively small segment of business, known as social entrepreneurship (SE), is increasingly being acknowledged as an effective source of solutions for a variety of social problems. Because society tends to view "new" solutions as "the" solution, we are concerned that SE will soon be expected to provide answers to our most pressing social ills. In this paper we call into question the ability of SE, by itself, to provide solutions on a scope necessary to address large-scale social issues. SE (...)
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  • Organizing for Society: A Typology of Social Entrepreneuring Models. [REVIEW]Johanna Mair, Julie Battilana & Julian Cardenas - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):353-373.
    In this article, we use content and cluster analysis on a global sample of 200 social entrepreneurial organizations to develop a typology of social entrepreneuring models. This typology is based on four possible forms of capital that can be leveraged: social, economic, human, and political. Furthermore, our findings reveal that these four social entrepreneuring models are associated with distinct logics of justification that may explain different ways of organizing across organizations. This study contributes to understanding social entrepreneurship as a field (...)
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  • Social Entrepreneurship in Theory and Practice—An Introduction.Nicola M. Pless - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (3):317-320.
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  • Harmonious Society and Chinese Csr: Is There Really a Link?Geoffrey See - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):1 - 22.
    In 2005, Chinese President Hu Jintao instituted a “Harmonious Society” policy marking a new China’s approach toward development. This generated intense excitement among observers of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) who perceive an overlap in objectives between CSR and Harmonious Society and believe that Harmonious Society will lead to increased CSR engagement in China. However, there is little exploration of how Harmonious Society will contribute to increasing CSR engagement. This article seeks to explore whether Harmonious Society will meet this promise. It (...)
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  • Enabling the Original Intent: Catalysts for Social Entrepreneurship.Craig V. VanSandt, Mukesh Sud & Christopher Marmé - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S3):419 - 428.
    As capitalist economies have shifted their primary focus from providing goods and services for all, to concentrating wealth at the top echelons of societies, social entrepreneurs have been one source of re-capturing the original intent of capitalism. Social entrepreneurs have combined the efficiency and effectiveness of business organizations with the social concerns of many non-profit and governmental agencies. As a result, social entrepreneurship is viewed as having significant potential for alleviating many of the social ills we now face. To accomplish (...)
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  • Platforms for Cross-Sector Social Partnerships: Prospective Sensemaking Devices for Social Benefit. [REVIEW]John W. Selsky & Barbara Parker - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (1):21 - 37.
    Cross-sector social partnerships (CSSPs) can produce benefits at individual, organizational, sectoral and societal levels. In this article, we argue that the distribution of benefits depends in part on the cognitive frames held by partnership participants. Based on Selsky and Parker's (J Manage 31(6):849-873, 2005) review of CSSPs, we identify three analytic "platforms" for social partnerships — the resource-dependence platform, the social-issue platform, and the societal-sector platform. We situate platforms as prospective sensemaking devices that help project managers make sense of partnerships (...)
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  • Linking Social Entrepreneurship and Social Change: The Mediating Role of Empowerment.Helen M. Haugh & Alka Talwar - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (4):643-658.
    Entrepreneurship is increasingly considered to be integral to development; however, social and cultural norms impact on the extent to which women in developing countries engage with, and accrue the benefits of, entrepreneurial activity. Using data collected from 49 members of a rural social enterprise in North India, we examine the relationships between social entrepreneurship, empowerment and social change. Innovative business processes that facilitated women’s economic activity and at the same time complied with local social and cultural norms that constrain their (...)
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  • The Impact of Moral Intensity and Desire for Control on Scaling Decisions in Social Entrepreneurship.Brett R. Smith, Geoffrey M. Kistruck & Benedetto Cannatelli - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (4):677-689.
    While research has focused on why certain entrepreneurs elect to create innovative solutions to social problems, very little is known about why some social entrepreneurs choose to scale their solutions while others do not. Research on scaling has generally focused on organizational characteristics often overlooking factors at the individual level that may affect scaling decisions. Drawing on the multidimensional construct of moral intensity, we propose a theoretical model of ethical decision making to explain why a social entrepreneur’s perception of moral (...)
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  • New Strategies for a Sustainable Society.Helen Haugh - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (4):743-749.
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  • New Strategies for a Sustainable Society: The Growing Contribution of Social Entrepreneurship.Helen Haugh - 2007 - Business Ethics Quarterly 17 (4):743-749.
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  • The Political "Participation" of Entrepreneurs: Challenge or Opportunity for the Chinese Communist Party?Gilles Guiheux - 2006 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 73:219-244.
    This article aims at analyzing the means of political influence that private entrepreneurs have accumulated along the years. For the Party-State that wishes to maintain its monopoly on political activities, the challenge is clearly to adjust to the rapidly changing shape of the Chinese society. The question being addressed is therefore how, in a still authoritarian regime, the emergence of a new social group or stratum, economically and socially influent, affects the political realm. In the first section, this article reviews (...)
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  • ""The Political" Participation" of Entrepreneurs: Challenge or Opportunity for the Chinese Communist Party?Gilles Guiheux - 2006 - Social Research: An International Quarterly 73 (1):219-244.
    This article aims at analyzing the means of political influence that private entrepreneurs have accumulated along the years. For the Party-State that wishes to maintain its monopoly on political activities, the challenge is clearly to adjust to the rapidly changing shape of the Chinese society. The question being addressed is therefore how, in a still authoritarian regime, the emergence of a new social group or stratum, economically and socially influent, affects the political realm. In the first section, this article reviews (...)
     
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