Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. The Unwitting Sacrifice Problem.G. Gillett - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (6):327-332.
    The diagnosis of bipolar disorder has been linked to giftedness of various sorts and this raises a special problem in that it is likely that the condition has a genetic basis. Therefore it seems possible that in the near future we will be able to detect and eliminate the gene predisposing to the disorder. This may mean, however, that, as a society, we lose the associated gifts. We might then face a difficult decision either way in that it is unclear (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • What Makes People Revise Their Beliefs Following Contradictory Anecdotal Evidence?: The Role of Systemic Variability and Direct Experience.Henry Markovits & Christophe Schmeltzer - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (3):535-547.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Autism as a Natural Human Variation: Reflections on the Claims of the Neurodiversity Movement. [REVIEW]Pier Jaarsma & Stellan Welin - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (1):20-30.
    Neurodiversity has remained a controversial concept over the last decade. In its broadest sense the concept of neurodiversity regards atypical neurological development as a normal human difference. The neurodiversity claim contains at least two different aspects. The first aspect is that autism, among other neurological conditions, is first and foremost a natural variation. The other aspect is about conferring rights and in particular value to the neurodiversity condition, demanding recognition and acceptance. Autism can be seen as a natural variation on (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Trapped Children: Popular Images of Children with Autism in the 1960s and 2000s. [REVIEW]Jennifer C. Sarrett - 2011 - Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (2):141-153.
    The lay public inherits much of its information about disability and mental illness through the media, which often relies on information from popular scientific works. Autism, as it was defined during the dominance of psychogenic paradigms of mental illness, generated certain tropes surrounding it, many of which have been popularized through media representations. Often inaccurate, these tropes have persisted into contemporary times despite a paradigmatic shift from psychogenic to biological explanations and treatments for mental illness. The current article examines images (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • How We Have Been Learning to Talk About Autism: A Role for Stories.Ian Hacking - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):499-516.
  • Autistic Autobiography.Ian Hacking - 2010 - In Francesca Happé & Uta Frith (eds.), Autism and Talent. Oup/the Royal Society.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations