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  1. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.Thomas S. Kuhn - 1962 - Philosophical Quarterly 14 (57):377-379.
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  • The Dappled World: A Study of the Boundaries of Science.Nancy Cartwright - 1999 - Cambridge University Press.
    It is often supposed that the spectacular successes of our modern mathematical sciences support a lofty vision of a world completely ordered by one single elegant theory. In this book Nancy Cartwright argues to the contrary. When we draw our image of the world from the way modern science works - as empiricism teaches us we should - we end up with a world where some features are precisely ordered, others are given to rough regularity and still others behave in (...)
  • The Dappled World: A Study of the Boundaries of Science.Nancy Cartwright - 1999 - Philosophy 75 (294):613-616.
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  • The Scientific Image.Bas C. Van Fraassen - 1980 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (5):274-283.
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  • A General Characterization of Adaptive Logics.Diderik Batens - 2001 - Logique Et Analyse 173 (175):45-68.
  • How to Be Realistic About Inconsistency in Science.Bryson Brown - 1990 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 21 (2):281-294.
  • Understanding Inconsistent Science.Peter Vickers - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Peter Vickers examines 'inconsistent theories' in the history of science--theories which, though contradictory, are held to be extremely useful. He argues that these 'theories' are actually significantly different entities, and warns that the traditional goal of philosophy to make substantial, general claims about how science works is misguided.
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  • Chunk and Permeate II: Bohr’s Hydrogen Atom.M. Bryson Brown & Graham Priest - 2015 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 5 (3):297-314.
    Niels Bohr’s model of the hydrogen atom is widely cited as an example of an inconsistent scientific theory because of its reliance on classical electrodynamics together with assumptions about interactions between matter and electromagnetic radiation that could not be reconciled with CED. This view of Bohr’s model is controversial, but we believe a recently proposed approach to reasoning with inconsistent commitments offers a promising formal reading of how Bohr’s model worked. In this paper we present this new way of reasoning (...)
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  • On the Preservation of Reliability.Bryson Brown - 2016 - In Peter Verdée & Holger Andreas (eds.), Logical Studies of Paraconsistent Reasoning in Science and Mathematics. Springer Verlag.
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  • Re-Engineering Philosophy for Limited Beings: Piecewise Approximations to Reality.William C. Wimsatt - 2007 - Harvard University Press.
    This book offers a philosophy for error-prone humans trying to understand messy systems in the real world.
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  • A Companion to Philosophical Logic.Dale Jacquette - 2004 - Studia Logica 77 (3):439-452.
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  • A Brief History of the Paradox: Philosophy and the Labyrinths of the Mind.Roy Sorensen - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    Can God create a stone too heavy for him to lift? Can time have a beginning? Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Riddles, paradoxes, conundrums--for millennia the human mind has found such knotty logical problems both perplexing and irresistible. Now Roy Sorensen offers the first narrative history of paradoxes, a fascinating and eye-opening account that extends from the ancient Greeks, through the Middle Ages, the Enlightenment, and into the twentieth century. When Augustine asked what God was doing before (...)
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  • Chunk and Permeate III: The Dirac Delta Function.Richard Benham, Chris Mortensen & Graham Priest - 2014 - Synthese 191 (13):3057-3062.
    Dirac’s treatment of his well known Delta function was apparently inconsistent. We show how to reconstruct his reasoning using the inconsistency-tolerant technique of Chunk and Permeate. In passing we take note of limitations and developments of that technique.
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  • Is Water H2O? Evidence, Realism and Pluralism.Hasok Chang - 2012 - Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science.
  • Lord Kelvin and the Age of the Earth.J. D. Burchfield & G. L. Herries Davies - 1994 - Annals of Science 51 (1):99-99.
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