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  1. From Affective Blindsight to Emotional Consciousness.Alessia Celeghin, Beatrice de Gelder & Marco Tamietto - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:414-425.
  • Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain.Antonio R. Damasio - 1994 - Putnam.
  • Amygdala Response to Emotional Stimuli Without Awareness: Facts and Interpretations.Matteo Diano, Alessia Celeghin, Arianna Bagnis & Marco Tamietto - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • The Cognitive Side of M1.Barbara Tomasino & Michele Gremese - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  • Large-Scale Brain Networks in Cognition: Emerging Methods and Principles.Steven L. Bressler & Vinod Menon - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (6):277-290.
  • Don't Give Up on Basic Emotions.Andrea Scarantino & Paul Griffiths - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):444-454.
    We argue that there are three coherent, nontrivial notions of basic-ness: conceptual basic-ness, biological basic-ness, and psychological basic-ness. There is considerable evidence for conceptually basic emotion categories (e.g., “anger,” “fear”). These categories do not designate biologically basic emotions, but some forms of anger, fear, and so on that are biologically basic in a sense we will specify. Finally, two notions of psychological basic-ness are distinguished, and the evidence for them is evaluated. The framework we offer acknowledges the force of some (...)
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  • The Conceptual Act Theory: A Précis.Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (4):292-297.
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  • A Higher-Order Theory of Emotional Consciousness.Richard Brown & Joseph LeDoux - 2017 - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.
    Emotional states of consciousness, or what are typically called emotional feelings, are traditionally viewed as being innately programed in subcortical areas of the brain, and are often treated as different from cognitive states of consciousness, such as those related to the perception of external stimuli. We argue that conscious experiences, regardless of their content, arise from one system in the brain. On this view, what differs in emotional and non-emotional states is the kind of inputs that are processed by a (...)
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  • Non-Conscious Recognition of Emotional Body Language.Beatrice de Gelder & Nouchine Hadjikhani - 2006 - Neuroreport 17 (6):583-586.
  • Emotion Perception From Face, Voice, and Touch: Comparisons and Convergence.Annett Schirmer & Ralph Adolphs - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (3):216-228.
  • Theta Band Activity in Response to Emotional Expressions and its Relationship with Gamma Band Activity as Revealed by MEG and Advanced Beamformer Source Imaging.Qian Luo, Xi Cheng, Tom Holroyd, Duo Xu, Frederick Carver & R. James Blair - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • A Network Model of the Emotional Brain.Luiz Pessoa - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (5):357-371.
  • Conscious, Preconscious, and Subliminal Processing: A Testable Taxonomy.Stanislas Dehaene, Jean-Pierre Changeux, Lionel Naccache, Jérôme Sackur & Claire Sergent - 2006 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (5):204-211.
    Amidst the many brain events evoked by a visual stimulus, which are specifically associated with conscious perception, and which merely reflect non-conscious processing? Several recent neuroimaging studies have contrasted conscious and non-conscious visual processing, but their results appear inconsistent. Some support a correlation of conscious perception with early occipital events, others with late parieto-frontal activity. Here we attempt to make sense of those dissenting results. On the basis of a minimal neuro-computational model, the global neuronal workspace hypothesis, we propose a (...)
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  • The Shared Circuits Model. How Control, Mirroring, and Simulation Can Enable Imitation and Mind Reading.Susan L. Hurley - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):1-22.
    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines; it is here surveyed under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, mirroring and simulation. It is cast at a middle, (...)
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  • Amygdala, Pulvinar, and Inferior Parietal Cortex Contribute to Early Processing of Faces Without Awareness.Vanessa Troiani & Robert T. Schultz - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  • The Shared Circuits Model (SCM): How Control, Mirroring, and Simulation Can Enable Imitation, Deliberation, and Mindreading.Susan Hurley - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):1-22.
    Imitation, deliberation, and mindreading are characteristically human sociocognitive skills. Research on imitation and its role in social cognition is flourishing across various disciplines. Imitation is surveyed in this target article under headings of behavior, subpersonal mechanisms, and functions of imitation. A model is then advanced within which many of the developments surveyed can be located and explained. The shared circuits model (SCM) explains how imitation, deliberation, and mindreading can be enabled by subpersonal mechanisms of control, mirroring, and simulation. It is (...)
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  • Neural Reuse: A Fundamental Organizational Principle of the Brain.Michael L. Anderson - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (4):245.
    An emerging class of theories concerning the functional structure of the brain takes the reuse of neural circuitry for various cognitive purposes to be a central organizational principle. According to these theories, it is quite common for neural circuits established for one purpose to be exapted (exploited, recycled, redeployed) during evolution or normal development, and be put to different uses, often without losing their original functions. Neural reuse theories thus differ from the usual understanding of the role of neural plasticity (...)
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  • Functional Specialization Does Not Require a One-to-One Mapping Between Brain Regions and Emotions.Andrea Scarantino - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):161-162.
    Lindquist et al. have assumed that functional specialization requires a one-to-one mapping between brain regions and discrete emotions. This assumption is in tension with the fact that regions can have multiple functions in the context of different, possibly distributed, networks. Once we open the door to other forms of functional specialization, neuroimaging data no longer favor constructionist models over natural kind models.
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  • The Brain Basis of Emotion: A Meta-Analytic Review.Kristen A. Lindquist, Tor D. Wager, Hedy Kober, Eliza Bliss-Moreau & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):121-143.
    Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science. With a surge of studies in affective neuroscience in recent decades, scientists are poised to answer this question. In this target article, we present a meta-analytic summary of the neuroimaging literature on human emotion. We compare the locationist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories consistently and specifically correspond to distinct brain regions) with the psychological constructionist approach (i.e., the hypothesis that discrete emotion categories (...)
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  • Degeneracy and Redundancy in Cognitive Anatomy.Karl J. Friston & Cathy J. Price - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (4):151-152.
  • Speeded Manual Responses to Unseen Visual Stimuli in Hemianopic Patients: What Kind of Blindsight?Alessia Celeghin, Marissa Barabas, Francesca Mancini, Matteo Bendini, Emilio Pedrotti, Massimo Prior, Anna Cantagallo, Silvia Savazzi & Carlo A. Marzi - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 32:6-14.
  • Précis of After Phrenology: Neural Reuse and the Interactive Brain.Michael L. Anderson - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39:1-22.
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  • Cognitive Ontology and Region- Versus Network-Oriented Analyses.Colin Klein - 2012 - Philosophy of Science 79 (5):952-960.
    The interpretation of functional imaging experiments is complicated by the pluripotency of brain regions. As there is a many-to-one mapping between cognitive functions and their neural substrates, region-based analyses of imaging data provide only weak support for cognitive theories. Price and Friston argue that we need a ‘cognitive ontology’ that abstractly categorizes the function of regions. I argue that abstract characterizations are unlikely to be cognitively interesting. I argue instead that we should attribute functions to regions in a context-sensitive manner. (...)
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  • Four Models of Basic Emotions: A Review of Ekman and Cordaro, Izard, Levenson, and Panksepp and Watt. [REVIEW]Jessica L. Tracy & Daniel Randles - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):397-405.
    In this special section, Ekman and Cordaro (2011); Izard (2011); Levenson (2011); and Panksepp and Watt (2011) have each outlined the latest instantiation of each lead author’s theoretical model of basic emotions. We identify four themes emerging from these models, and discuss areas of agreement and disagreement. We then briefly evaluate the models’ usefulness by examining how they would account for an emotion that has received considerable empirical attention but does not fit clearly within or outside of the basic emotion (...)
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  • What's Basic About Basic Emotions?Andrew Ortony & Terence J. Turner - 1990 - Psychological Review 97 (3):315-331.
  • Neural Response to Emotional Faces with and Without Awareness; Event-Related fMRI in a Parietal Patient with Visual Extinction and Spatial Neglect.Patrik Vuilleumier, J. L. Armony, Karen Clarke, Masud Husain, Julia Driver & Raymond J. Dolan - 2002 - Neuropsychologia 40 (12):2156-2166.
  • Concept of Emotion Viewed From a Prototype Perspective.Beverley Fehr & James A. Russell - 1984 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 113 (3):464-486.
  • The Psychological Construction of Emotion.Lisa Feldman Barrett & James Russell (eds.) - 2014 - Guilford Press.
     
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  • Emotion Drives Attention: Detecting the Snake in the Grass.Arne Öhman, Anders Flykt & Francisco Esteves - 2001 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (3):466.
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  • Conscious and Unconscious Emotional Learning in the Human Amygdala.J. S. Morris, A. Ohman & Raymond J. Dolan - 1998 - Nature 393:467-470.
  • Natural Categories.Eleanor Rosch - 1973 - Cognitive Psychology 4 (3):328-350.
    The hypothesis of the study was that the domains of color and form are structured into nonarbitrary, semantic categories which develop around perceptually salient “natural prototypes.” Categories which reflected such an organization (where the presumed natural prototypes were central tendencies of the categories) and categories which violated the organization (natural prototypes peripheral) were taught to a total of 162 members of a Stone Age culture which did not initially have hue or geometric-form concepts. In both domains, the presumed “natural” categories (...)
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  • The Neural Correlates of Moral Decision-Making in Psychopathy.A. L. Glenn, A. Raine & R. A. Schug - 2009 - Molecular Psychiatry 14:5-6.
  • Emotional Evaluation with and Without Conscious Stimulus Identification: Evidence From a Split-Brain Patient.E. Làdavas, D. Cimatti, M. Del Pesce & G. Tuozzi - 1993 - Cognition and Emotion 7 (1):95-114.
  • The Brain's Concepts: The Role of the Sensory-Motor System in Conceptual Knowledge.Vittorio Gallese & George Lakoff - unknown
    Concepts are the elementary units of reason and linguistic meaning. They are conventional and relatively stable. As such, they must somehow be the result of neural activity in the brain. The questions are: Where? and How? A common philosophical position is that all concepts—even concepts about action and perception—are symbolic and abstract, and therefore must be implemented outside the brain’s sensory-motor system. We will argue against this position using (1) neuroscientific evidence; (2) results from neural computation; and (3) results about (...)
     
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  • Spatial Attention Speeds Discrimination Without Awareness in Blindsight.Robert W. Kentridge, Charles A. Heywood & Lawrence Weiskrantz - 2004 - Neuropsychologia 42 (6):831-835.
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