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  1. Are Thought Experiments Just What You Thought?John D. Norton - 1996 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 26 (3):333 - 366.
    Canadian Journal of Philosophy, 26, pp. 333-66. 1996.
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  • Perceptual Symbol Systems.Lawrence W. Barsalou - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):577-660.
    Prior to the twentieth century, theories of knowledge were inherently perceptual. Since then, developments in logic, statis- tics, and programming languages have inspired amodal theories that rest on principles fundamentally different from those underlying perception. In addition, perceptual approaches have become widely viewed as untenable because they are assumed to implement record- ing systems, not conceptual systems. A perceptual theory of knowledge is developed here in the context of current cognitive science and neuroscience. During perceptual experience, association areas in the (...)
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  • Review of Thomas S. Kuhn The Essential Tension: Selected Studies in Scientific Tradition and Change. [REVIEW]David Zaret - 1981 - Philosophical Review 90 (1):146.
    Review of T. S. Kuhn's The Essential Tension.
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  • Galileo and the Indispensability of Scientific Thought Experiment.Tamar Szabó Gendler - 1998 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 49 (3):397-424.
    By carefully examining one of the most famous thought experiments in the history of science—that by which Galileo is said to have refuted the Aristotelian theory that heavier bodies fall faster than lighter ones—I attempt to show that thought experiments play a distinctive role in scientific inquiry. Reasoning about particular entities within the context of an imaginary scenario can lead to rationally justified concluusions that—given the same initial information—would not be rationally justifiable on the basis of a straightforward argument.
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  • Imaginary Science. [REVIEW]David Gooding - 1994 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (4):1029-1045.
  • The Step to Rationality: The Efficacy of Thought Experiments in Science, Ethics, and Free Will.Roger N. Shepard - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (1):3-35.
  • Review: Imaginary Science. [REVIEW]David Gooding - 1994 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 45 (4):1029 - 1045.
  • The Essential Tension.T. S. Kuhn - 1977 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 31 (4):359-375.
  • Mechanical Reasoning by Mental Simulation.Mary Hegarty - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (6):280-285.
  • Peeking Into Plato’s Heaven.James Robert Brown - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):1126-1138.
    Examples of classic thought experiments are presented and some morals drawn. The views of my fellow symposiasts, Tamar Gendler, John Norton, and James McAllister, are evaluated. An account of thought experiments along a priori and Platonistic lines is given. I also cite the related example of proving theorems in mathematics with pictures and diagrams. To illustrate the power of these methods, a possible refutation of the continuum hypothesis using a thought experiment is sketched.
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  • The Theory of Learning by Doing.Yuichiro Anzai & Herbert A. Simon - 1979 - Psychological Review 86 (2):124-140.
  • Observed Methods for Generating Analogies in Scientific Problem Solving.John Clement - 1988 - Cognitive Science 12 (4):563-586.
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  • Mental Images and Their Transformations.Roger N. Shepard & Lynn N. Cooper - 1982 - MIT Press.
     
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  • The Laboratory of the Mind: Thought Experiments in the Natural Sciences.James Robert Brown - 1991 - Routledge.
    Newton's bucket, Einstein's elevator, Schrödinger's cat – these are some of the best-known examples of thought experiments in the natural sciences. But what function do these experiments perform? Are they really experiments at all? Can they help us gain a greater understanding of the natural world? How is it possible that we can learn new things just by thinking? In this revised and updated new edition of his classic text _The Laboratory of the Mind_, James Robert Brown continues to defend (...)
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  • Creating Scientific Concepts.Nancy Nersessian - unknown
    How do novel scientific concepts arise? In Creating Scientific Concepts, Nancy Nersessian seeks to answer this central but virtually unasked question in the problem of conceptual change. She argues that the popular image of novel concepts and profound insight bursting forth in a blinding flash of inspiration is mistaken. Instead, novel concepts are shown to arise out of the interplay of three factors: an attempt to solve specific problems; the use of conceptual, analytical, and material resources provided by the cognitive-social-cultural (...)
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  • The Evolution of Physics.Albert Einstein & Léopold Infeld - 1939 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 46 (1):173-173.
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  • Modelling Intuitions and Thought Experiments.Nenad Miščević - 2007 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):181-214.
    The first, critical part of the paper summarizes J. R. Brown’s Platonic view of thought experiments (TEs) and raises several questions. One of them concerns the initial, particular judgments in a TE. Since they seem to precede the general insight, Brown’s Platonic intuition, and not to derive from it, the question arises as to the nature of the initial particular judgment. The other question concerns the explanatory status of Brown’s epistemic Platonism. The second, constructive descriptive-explanatory part argues for an alternative, (...)
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  • Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems.Galileo Galilei & Stillman Drake - 1954 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (19):253-256.
  • The Procedural Turn; or, Why Do Thought Experiments Work?David Gooding - 1992 - In R. Giere & H. Feigl (eds.), Cognitive Models of Science. University of Minnesota Press. pp. 45-76.
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  • Image and Mind.Stephen M. Kosslyn - 1980 - Harvard University Press.
    The book also introduces a host of new experimental techniques and major hypotheses to guide future research.
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  • The Cognitive Basis of Model-Based Reasoning in Science.Nancy J. Nersessian - 2002 - In Peter Carruthers, Stephen Stich & Michael Siegal (eds.), The Cognitive Basis of Science. Cambridge University Press. pp. 133--153.
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