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  1. The Pareto Argument for Inequality.G. A. Cohen - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (1):160-185.
    Some ways of defending inequality against the charge that it is unjust require premises that egalitarians find easy to dismiss—statements, for example, about the contrasting deserts and/or entitlements of unequally placed people. But a defense of inequality suggested by John Rawls and elaborated by Brian Barry has often proved irresistible even to people of egalitarian outlook. The persuasive power of this defense of inequality has helped to drive authentic egalitarianism, of an old-fashioned, uncompromising kind, out of contemporary political philosophy. The (...)
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  • Rights and Duties in an Egalitarian Society.Joseph H. Carens - 1986 - Political Theory 14 (1):31-49.
  • Incentives, Inequality, and Publicity.Andrew Williams - 1998 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 27 (3):225-247.
    The JSTOR Archive is a trusted digital repository providing for long-term preservation and access to leading academic journals and scholarly literature from around the world. The Archive is supported by libraries, scholarly societies, publishers, and foundations. It is an initiative of JSTOR, a not-for-profit organization with a mission to help the scholarly community take advantage of advances in technology. For more information regarding JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.
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  • On the Site of Distributive Justice: Reflections on Cohen and Murphy.Thomas W. Pogge - 2000 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 29 (2):137-169.
  • Fairness, Respect, and the Egalitarian Ethos.Jonathan Wolff - 1998 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 27 (2):97-122.
  • Debate: Liberalism, Equality, and Fraternity in Cohen's Critique of Rawls.David Estlund - 1998 - Journal of Political Philosophy 6 (1):99–112.
  • The Pareto Argument for Inequality*: G. A. COHEN.G. A. Cohen - 1995 - Social Philosophy and Policy 12 (1):160-185.
    Some ways of defending inequality against the charge that it is unjust require premises that egalitarians find easy to dismiss—statements, for example, about the contrasting deserts and/or entitlements of unequally placed people. But a defense of inequality suggested by John Rawls and elaborated by Brian Barry has often proved irresistible even to people of egalitarian outlook. The persuasive power of this defense of inequality has helped to drive authentic egalitarianism, of an old-fashioned, uncompromising kind, out of contemporary political philosophy. The (...)
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