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  1. Francis Bacon: From Magic to Science.Paolo Rossi & Sacha Rabinovitch - 1968 - Philosophy 44 (170):352-353.
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  • The Business of Enlightenment: A Publishing History of the Encyclopédie 1775-1800.Robert Darnton - 1979 - Diderot Studies 21:237-239.
     
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  • The Rise of Public Science: Rhetoric, Technology and Natural Philosophy in Newtonian Britain, 1660-1750.L. Stewart & J. A. Bennett - 1994 - Annals of Science 51 (5):555-555.
  • Natural Philosophy and Public Spectacle in the Eighteenth Century.S. Schaffer - 1983 - History of Science 21 (1):1-43.
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  • The House of Experiment in Seventeenth-Century England.Steven Shapin - 1988 - Isis 79 (3):373-404.
  • “A Scholar and a Gentleman”: The Problematic Identity of the Scientific Practitioner in Early Modern England.S. Shapin - 1991 - History of Science 29 (3):279-327.
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  • The Structural Transformation of the Public Sphere: An Inquiry Into a Category of Bourgeois Society.Jürgen Habermas & Thomas Burger - 1994 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 27 (1):70-76.
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  • The Jargon of Authenticity.Theodor W. Adorno - 1977 - Studies in Soviet Thought 17 (3):267-272.
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  • Darwin's Metaphor: Nature's Place in Victorian Culture.Robert M. Young - 1987 - Journal of the History of Biology 20 (1):131-132.
  • Merton Revisited.A. Rupert Hall - 1963 - History of Science 2:1.
  • Inhibition, History and Meaning in the Sciences of Mind and Brain (Greta Jones).R. Smith - 1994 - History of the Human Sciences 7:121-121.
    In everyday parlance, "inhibition" suggests repression, tight control, the opposite of freedom. In medicine and psychotherapy the term is commonplace, its definition understood. Relating how inhibition—the word and the concept—became a bridge between society at large and the natural sciences of mind and brain, Smith constructs an engagingly original history of our view of ourselves. Not until the late nineteenth century did the term "inhibition" become common in English, connoting the dependency of reason and of civilization itself on the repression (...)
     
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  • The Theory of Practice and the Practice of Theory: Sociological Approaches in the History of Science.Jan Golinski - 1990 - Isis 81 (3):492-505.
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  • Public Lectures and Private Patronage in Newtonian England.Larry Stewart - 1986 - Isis 77 (1):47-58.
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  • Thomas Kuhn.Barry Barnes - 1985 - In Quentin Skinner (ed.), The Return of Grand Theory in the Human Sciences. Cambridge University Press. pp. 83--100.
     
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