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  1. The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Thinkers.Stephen Yablo - 2000 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 9:35-45.
    By effective thinkers I mean not people who think effectively, but people who understand “how it’s done,” i.e., people not paralyzed by the philosophical problem of epiphenomenalism. I argue that mental causes are not preempted by either neural or narrow content states, and that extrinsically individuated mental states are not out of proportion with their putative effects. I give three examples/models of how an extrinsic cause might be more proportional to an effect than the competition.
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  • On the Matter of Minds and Mental Causation.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 1998 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (1):1-25.
    There is a difference between someone breaking a glass by accidentally brushing up against it and smashing a glass in a fit of anger. In the first case, the person's cognitive state has little to do with the event, but in the second, the mental state qua anger is quite relevant. How are we to understand this difference? What is the proper way to understand the relation between the mind, the brain, and the resultant behavior? This paper explores the popular (...)
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  • The Mind and its Place in Nature.C. D. Broad - 1925 - Routledge.
    First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
  • Part-Whole Physicalism and Mental Causation.Douglas Ehring - 2003 - Synthese 136 (3):359-388.
    A well-known ``overdetermination''argument aims to show that the possibility of mental causes of physical events in a causally closed physical world and the possibility of causally relevant mental properties are both problematic. In the first part of this paper, I extend an identity reply that has been given to the first problem to a property-instance account of causal relata. In the second, I argue that mental types are composed of physical types and, as a consequence, both mental and physical types (...)
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  • Problems of Mind and Matter.John Wisdom - 1934 - Cambridge University Press.
    Professor Wisdom gives an elementary introduction to the applications in philosophy of the analytical method. He believes that the aim of analysis is clarity, whereas the aim of speculative philosophy is truth. After a brief introduction on what analysis is, he discusses the relation of body and mind and seeks for causal relations between mental and material events. He concludes this section with a chapter on Free will, before turning to perception and the external world.
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  • Determination and Mental Causation.Sara Worley - 1997 - Erkenntnis 46 (3):281-304.
    Yablo suggests that we can understand the possibility of mental causation by supposing that mental properties determine physical properties, in the classic sense of determination according to which red determines scarlet. Determinates and their determinables do not compete for causal relevance, so if mental and physical properties are related as determinable and determinates, they should not compete for causal relevance either. I argue that this solution won''t work. I first construct a more adequate account of determination than that provided by (...)
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  • Mental Causes.John Heil & Alfred R. Mele - 1991 - American Philosophical Quarterly 28 (1):61-71.
    Our suspicion is that philosophers who tie the fate of agency to advances in cognitive science simultaneously underestimate that conception's tenacity and overestimate their ability to divine the course of empirical inquiry. For the present, however, we shall pretend that current ideas about what would be required for the scientific vindication of folk psychology are apt, and ask where this leaves the notion of agency. Our answer will be that it leaves that notion on the whole unaffected.
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  • Mental Causation.Stephen Yablo - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (2):245-280.
  • Causally Relevant Properties.David Braun - 1995 - Philosophical Perspectives 9:447-75.
    In this paper I present an analysis of causal relevance for properties. I believe that most of us are already familiar with the notion of a causally relevant property. But some of us may not recognize it "under that description." So I begin below with some intuitive explanations and some illustrative examples.
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  • Why the Exclusion Problem Seems Intractable and How, Just Maybe, to Tract It.Karen Bennett - 2003 - Noûs 37 (3):471-97.
    The basic form of the exclusion problem is by now very, very familiar. 2 Start with the claim that the physical realm is causally complete: every physical thing that happens has a sufficient physical cause. Add in the claim that the mental and the physical are distinct. Toss in some claims about overdetermination, give it a stir, and voilá—suddenly it looks as though the mental never causes anything, at least nothing physical. As it is often put, the physical does all (...)
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  • On the Matter of Minds and Mental Causation.Valerie Gray Hardcastle - 1998 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 58 (1):1-25.
    There is a difference between someone breaking a glass by accidentally brushing up against it and smashing a glass in a fit of anger. In the first case, the person's cognitive state has little to do with the event, but in the second, the mental state qua anger is quite relevant. How are we to understand this difference? What is the proper way to understand the relation between the mind, the brain, and the resultant behavior? This paper explores the popular (...)
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  • Making Mind Matter More.Jerry A. Fodor - 1989 - Philosophical Topics 17 (11):59-79.
  • Determinables, Determinates and Determinants: I.Arthur N. Prior - 1949 - Mind 58:1.
  • The Determinable-Determinate Relation.Eric Funkhouser - 2006 - Noûs 40 (3):548–569.
    The properties colored and red stand in a special relation. Namely, red is a determinate of colored, and colored is determinable relative to red. Many other properties are similarly related. The determination relation is an interesting topic of logical investigation in its own right, and the prominent philosophical inquiries into this relation have, accordingly, operated at a high level of abstraction.1 It is time to return to these investigations, not just as a logical amusement, but for the payoffs such investigation (...)
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  • Parallelism, Interactionism, and Causation.Laird Addis - 1984 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 9 (1):329-344.
    One may gather from the arguments of two of the last papers published before his death that J. L. Mackie held the following three theses concerning the mind/body problem : (1) There is a distinct realm of mental properties, so a dualism of properties at least is true and materialism false.
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  • Mental Causation, Determinables, and Property Instances.Douglas Ehring - 1996 - Noûs 30 (4):461-80.
  • Wide Causation.S. Yablo - 1996 - Philosophical Perspectives 11 (11):251-281.
  • Kim on Mental Causation and Causal Exclusion.Terence E. Horgan - 1997 - Philosophical Perspectives 11 (s11):165-84.
  • I.—determinables, determinates and determinants.Arthur N. Prior - 1949 - Mind 58 (229):1-20.
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  • Mind, Brain, and Causation.J. L. Mackie - 1979 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 4 (1):19-29.
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  • Anomalous Monism and the Problem of Explanatory Force.Louise Antony - 1989 - Philosophical Review 98 (April):153-87.
    Concern about two problems runs through the work of davidson: the problem of accounting for the "explanatory force" of rational explanations, and the problem posed for materialism by the apparent anomalousness of psychological events. davidson believes that his view of mental causation, imbedded in his theory of "anomalous monism," can provide satisfactory answers to both questions. however, it is argued in this paper that davidson's program contains a fundamental inconsistency; that his metaphysics, while grounding the doctrine of anomalous monism, makes (...)
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  • The Compatibility of Mechanism and Purpose.Alvin I. Goldman - 1969 - Philosophical Review 78 (October):468-82.
  • Reasons and causes.Fred Dretske - 1989 - Philosophical Perspectives 3:1-15.
  • Mechanism, Purpose, and Explanatory Exclusion.Jaegwon Kim - 1989 - Philosophical Perspectives 3:77-108.
  • Type Epiphenomenalism, Type Dualism, and the Causal Priority of the Physical.Brian P. McLaughlin - 1989 - Philosophical Perspectives 3:109-135.
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  • Mental Quausation.Terence Horgan - 1989 - Philosophical Perspectives 3:47-74.
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  • The Conceivability of Mechanism.Norman Malcolm - 1968 - Philosophical Review 77 (January):45-72.
  • Statement and Inference, with Other Philosophical Papers.John Cook Wilson - 1926 - Clarendon Press.
  • Mind-Body Causation and Explanatory Practice.Tyler Burge - 1993 - In John Heil & Alfred R. Mele (eds.), Mental Causation. Oxford University Press.
    Argument for Epiphenomenalism [I]: (A) Mental event-tokens are identical with physical event-tokens. (B) The causal powers of a physical event are determined only by its physical properties; and (C) mental properties are not reducible to physical properties.
     
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  • Seven Habits of Highly Effective Thinkers.Stephen Yablo - 2000 - In Bernard Elevitch (ed.), The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy. Philosophy Documentation Center. pp. 35-45.
    By effective thinkers I mean not people who think effectively, but people who understand “how it’s done,” i.e., people not paralyzed by the philosophical problem of epiphenomenalism. I argue that mental causes are not preempted by either neural or narrow content states, and that extrinsically individuated mental states are not out of proportion with their putative effects. I give three examples/models of how an extrinsic cause might be more proportional to an effect than the competition.
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  • Making Mind Matter More.Jerry Fodor - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy 84 (11):642.
  • Mind Matters.Ernest Lepore & Barry M. Loewer - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy 84 (November):630-642.
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  • Metaphysics and Mental Causation.Lynne Rudder Baker - 1993 - In John Heil & Alfred R. Mele (eds.), Mental Causation. Oxford University Press. pp. 75-96.
    My aim is twofold: first, to root out the metaphysical assumptions that generate the problem of mental causation and to show that they preclude its solution; second, to dissolve the problem of mental causation by motivating rejection of one of the metaphysical assumptions that give rise to it. There are three features of this metaphysical background picture that are important for our purposes. The first concerns the nature of reality: all reality depends on physical reality, where physical reality consists of (...)
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  • Physical Causal Closure and the Invisibility of Mental Causation.E. J. Lowe - 2003 - In Sven Walter & Heinz-Dieter Heckmann (eds.), Physicalism and Mental Causation. Imprint Academic. pp. 137-154.
     
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  • Logic: Part I.W. E. Johnson - 1921 - Mind 30 (120):448-455.
     
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  • Methodological and Ontological Aspects of the Mental Causation Problem.Ausonio Marras - 2003 - In Sven Walter & Heinz-Dieter Heckmann (eds.), Physicalism and Mental Causation. Imprint Academic.