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Adam Cureton (2013). A Contractualist Reading of Kant's Proof of the Formula of Humanity.

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  1.  63
    Freedom and the Source of Value: Korsgaard and Wood on Kant's Formula of Humanity.Christopher Arroyo - 2011 - Metaphilosophy 42 (4):353-359.
    Abstract: This essay examines two interpretations of Kant's argument for the formula of humanity. Christine M. Korsgaard defends a constructivist reading of Kant's argument, maintaining that humans must view themselves as having absolute value because their power for rational choice confers value on their ends. Allen Wood, however, defends a realist interpretation of Kant's argument, maintaining that humans actually are absolutely valuable and that their choices do not confer value but rather reflect their understanding of how the objects of their (...)
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  2.  33
    Establishing Kant's Formula of Humanity.Samuel V. Bruton - 2000 - Southwest Philosophy Review 16 (1):41-49.
  3.  92
    From Self-Respect to Respect for Others.Adam Cureton - 2013 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):166-187.
    The leading accounts of respect for others usually assume that persons have a rational nature, which is a marvelous thing, so they should be respected like other objects of ‘awesome’ value. Kant's views about the ‘value’ of humanity, which have inspired contemporary discussions of respect, have been interpreted in this way. I propose an alternative interpretation in which Kant proceeds from our own rational self-regard, through our willingness to reciprocate with others, to duties of respect for others. This strategy, which (...)
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  4. Kant's Formula of the End in Itself: Some Recent Debates.Lara Denis - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (2):244–257.
    This is a survey article in which I explore some important recent work on the topic in question, Kant’s formula of the end in itself (or “formula of humanity”). I first provide an overview of the formulation, including what the formula seems roughly to be saying, and what Kant’s main argument for it seems to be. I then call the reader’s attention to a variety of questions one might have about the import of and argument for this formula, alluding to (...)
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  5. Kant's Ethics and Duties to Oneself.Lara Denis - 1997 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 78 (4):321–348.
    This paper investigates the nature and foundation of duties to oneself in Kant's moral theory. Duties to oneself embody the requirement of the formula of humanity that agents respect rational nature in them-selves as well as in others. So understood, duties to oneself are not subject to the sorts of conceptual objections often raised against duties to oneself; nor do these duties support objections that Kant's moral theory is overly demanding or produces agents who are preoccupied with their own virtue. (...)
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  6.  91
    The Possibility of the Categorical Imperative.Paul Guyer - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (3):353-385.
  7. Treating Others Merely as Means.Samuel J. Kerstein - 2009 - Utilitas 21 (2):163-180.
    In the Formula of Humanity, Kant embraces the principle that it is wrong for us to treat others merely as means. For contemporary Kantian ethicists, this Mere Means Principle plays the role of a moral constraint: it limits what we may do, even in the service of promoting the overall good. But substantive interpretations of the principle generate implausible results in relatively ordinary cases. On one interpretation, for example, you treat your opponent in a tennis tournament merely as a means (...)
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  8.  84
    Mill's “Proof” of the Principle of Utility: A More Than Half-Hearted Defense.Geoffrey Sayre-McCord - 2001 - Social Philosophy and Policy 18 (2):330.
    How many serious mistakes can a brilliant philosopher make in a single paragraph? Many think that Mill answers this question by example—in the third paragraph of Chapter IV of Utilitarianism. Here is the notorious paragraph: The only proof capable of being given that an object is visible, is that people actually see it. The only proof that a sound is audible, is that people hear it: and so of the other sources of our experience. In like manner, I apprehend, the (...)
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    Korsgaard and the Unconditional in Morality.J. B. Schneewind - 1998 - Ethics 109 (1):36-48.
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  10.  75
    Kantian Duties to the Self, Explained and Defended.Jens Timmermann - 2006 - Philosophy 81 (3):505-530.
    The present article is an attempt to clarify the Kantian conception of duties to the self and to defend them against common objections. Kant’s thesis that all duty rests on duties to the self is shown to follow from the autonomy of the human will; and the allegation that they are impossible because the agent could always release himself from such a duty turns out to be question-begging. There is no attempt to prove that there are such duties, but they (...)
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  11.  65
    Value Without Regress: Kant's 'Formula of Humanity' Revisited.Jens Timmermann - 2006 - European Journal of Philosophy 14 (1):69–93.