References in work:

Adam Cureton (2016). Offensive Beneficence.

10 found
Order:
Are we missing references?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add references for the above work:

  1. Gratitude.Fred R. Berger - 1975 - Ethics 85 (4):298-309.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   17 citations  
  2. Appearing Respectful: The Moral Significance of Manners.Sarah Buss - 1999 - Ethics 109 (4):795-826.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   21 citations  
  3.  54
    The Ethics of Intervention.Julia Driver - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (4):851-870.
    This essay explores the obligations that may arise from benevolently intended interventions that go awry. The author argues that even when the intervening agent has acted with good intentions and in a non-negligent manner, she may be required to continue aid in cases where her initial intervention failed. This is surprising because it means that persons who perform supererogatory acts run the risk of incurring additional heavy obligations through no fault of their own. The author also considers deflationary accounts that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  4. Being Helped and Being Grateful: Imperfect Duties, the Ethics of Possession, and the Unity of Morality.Barbara Herman - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy 109 (5-6):391-411.
  5. The Ethics of Care, Dependence, and Disability.Eva Feder Kittay - 2011 - Ratio Juris 24 (1):49-58.
    According to the most important theories of justice, personal dignity is closely related to independence, and the care that people with disabilities receive is seen as a way for them to achieve the greatest possible autonomy. However, human beings are naturally subject to periods of dependency, and people without disabilities are only “temporarily abled.” Instead of seeing assistance as a limitation, we consider it to be a resource at the basis of a vision of society that is able to account (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  6.  45
    Thinking About the Good: Reconfiguring Liberal Metaphysics (or Not) for People with Cognitive Disabilities.Anita Silvers & Leslie Pickering Francis - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):475-498.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  7.  43
    Should I Be Grateful to You for Not Harming Me?Saul Smilansky - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (3):585 - 597.
    Getting people not to harm others is a central goal of morality. But while it is commonly perceived that those who benefit others merit gratitude, those who do not harm others are not ordinarily thought to merit anything. I attempt to argue against this, claiming that all the arguments against gratitude to the non-maleficent are unsuccessful. Finally, I explore the difference it would make if we thought that we owe gratitude to those who do not harm us.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  8.  51
    The Moral Significance of Gratitude in Kant's Ethics.Houston Smit & Mark Timmons - 2011 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (4):295-320.
    In this essay, we examine the grounds, nature and content, status, acquisition and role, and justification of gratitude in Kant's ethical system, making use of student notes from Kant's lectures on ethics. We are especially interested in questions about the significance of gratitude in Kant's ethics. We examine Kant's claim that gratitude is a sacred duty, because it cannot be discharged, and explain how this claim is consistent with his insistence that “ought” implies “can.” We argue that for Kant a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  9.  34
    The Moral and Social Dimensions of Gratitude.Roslyn Weiss - 1985 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):491-501.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  10. Gratitude as a Virtue.Christopher Heath Wellman - 1999 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 80 (3):284–300.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations