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  1. Aping Mankind: Neuromania, Darwinitis and the Misrepresentation of Humanity.Raymond Tallis - 2014 - Routledge.
    In a devastating critique Raymond Tallis exposes the exaggerated claims made for the ability of neuroscience and evolutionary theory to explain human consciousness, behaviour, culture and society. While readily acknowledging the astounding progress neuroscience has made in helping us understand how the brain works, Tallis directs his guns at neuroscience’s dark companion – "Neuromania" as he describes it – the belief that brain activity is not merely a necessary but a sufficient condition for human consciousness and that consequently our everyday (...)
     
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  • The Postmodern Adventure Science, Technology and Cultural Studies at the Third Millennium.Steven Best & Douglas Kellner - 2001
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  • Neuroeducation–a Critical Overview of an Emerging Field.Daniel Ansari, Bert De Smedt & Roland H. Grabner - 2012 - Neuroethics 5 (2):105-117.
    Abstract In the present article, we provide a critical overview of the emerging field of ‘neuroeducation’ also frequently referred to as ‘mind, brain and education’ or ‘educational neuroscience’. We describe the growing energy behind linking education and neuroscience in an effort to improve learning and instruction. We explore reasons behind such drives for interdisciplinary research. Reviewing some of the key advances in neuroscientific studies that have come to bear on neuroeducation, we discuss recent evidence on the brain circuits underlying reading, (...)
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  • The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development.Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations for NEST (...)
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  • The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development.Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations for NEST (...)
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  • Monitoring and Manipulating Brain Function: New Neuroscience Technologies and Their Ethical Implications.Martha J. Farah & Paul Root Wolpe - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (3):35-45.
  • “Neurohype” and the Name Game: Who's to Blame?Timothy Caulfield, Christen Rachul & Amy Zarzeczny - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (2):13-15.
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  • The Contemporary Theory of Metaphor.George Lakoff - 1993 - In Andrew Ortony (ed.), Metaphor and Thought. Cambridge University Press. pp. 202-251.
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