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  1. The Effects of Women on Corporate Boards on Firm Value, Financial Performance, and Ethical and Social Compliance.Helena Isidro & Márcia Sobral - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (1):1-19.
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  • Are Demographic Attributes and Firm Characteristics Drivers of Gender Diversity? Investigating Women’s Positions on French Boards of Directors.Mehdi Nekhili & Hayette Gatfaoui - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (2):227-249.
    In this article, we examine the factors determining the representation of women on boards of directors by considering three main questions. The first question deals with the relationship between characteristics of ownership and governance on one side, and female directorship on the other. The second major question concerns the demographic attributes of women directors, such as nationality, foreign experience, educational level, business expertise, and connections to external sources. The third important question refers to women in senior positions on French boards (...)
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  • Tone at the Top: An Ethics Code for Directors?Mark S. Schwartz, Thomas W. Dunfee & Michael J. Kline - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):79-100.
    . Recent corporate scandals have focused the attention of a broad set of constituencies on reforming corporate governance. Boards of directors play a leading role in corporate governance and any significant reforms must encompass their role. To date, most reform proposals have targeted the legal, rather than the ethical obligations of directors. Legal reforms without proper attention to ethical obligations will likely prove ineffectual. The ethical role of directors is critical. Directors have overall responsibility for the ethics and compliance programs (...)
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  • Business, Ethics, and Carol Gilligan's "Two Voices".Thomas I. White - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (1):51-61.
    This article argues that Carol Gilligan's research in moral development psychology, work which claims that women speak about ethics in a "different voice" than men do, is applicable to business ethics. This essay claims that Gilligan's "ethic of care" provides a plausible explanation for the results of two studies that found men and women handling ethical dilemmas in business differently. This paper also speculates briefly about the management implications of Gilligan's ideas.
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  • Toward the Feminine Firm: An Extension to Thomas White.John Dobson & Judith White - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (3):463-478.
    This paper concerns the influence of gender on a firm’s moral and economic performance. It supports Thomas White’s intimation of a male gender bias in the value system underlying extant business theory. We suggest that this gender bias may be corrected by drawing on the concept of substantive rationality inherent in virtue-ethics theory. This feminine-oriented relationship-based value system complements the essential nature of the firm as a nexus of relationships between stakeholders. Not only is this feminine firm morally desirable, but (...)
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  • Toward the Feminine Firm: An Extension to Thomas White.John Dobson & Judith White - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (3):463-478.
    This paper concerns the influence of gender on a firm’s moral and economic performance. It supports Thomas White’s intimation of a male gender bias in the value system underlying extant business theory. We suggest that this gender bias may be corrected by drawing on the concept of substantive rationality inherent in virtue-ethics theory. This feminine-oriented relationship-based value system complements the essential nature of the firm as a nexus of relationships between stakeholders. Not only is this feminine firm morally desirable, but (...)
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  • Resistance to Change in the Corporate Elite: Female Directors’ Appointments Onto Nordic Boards.Aleksandra Gregorič, Lars Oxelheim, Trond Randøy & Steen Thomsen - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 141 (2):267-287.
    In this empirical study, we investigate the variation in firms’ response to institutional pressure for gender-balanced boards, focusing specifically on the preservation of prevailing practices of director selection and its impact on the representation of women on the board of directors. Using 8 years of data from publicly listed Nordic corporations, we show societal pressure to be one of the determinants of female directorship. Moreover, in some corporations, the director selection process may work to maintain “a traditional type of board”. (...)
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  • Practices, Firms and Varieties of Capitalism.Russell Keat - 2008 - Philosophy of Management 7 (1):77-91.
    Against MacIntyre’s view that capitalism is incompatible with the conduct of economic production as a genuine practice, this paper claims that capitalist economies take a number of institutionally distinct forms, and that these differ significantly in the extent to which, and the reasons for which, they are antithetical to production as a practice. Drawing on the extensive literature in comparative political economy on varieties of capitalism, it argues that while ‘Liberal’ Market Economies such as the USA and UK conform quite (...)
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  • Business, Ethics, and Carol Gilligan's.Thomas I. White - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (1):51-61.
    This article argues that Carol Gilligan's research in moral development psychology, work which claims that women speak about ethics in a "different voice" than men do, is applicable to business ethics. This essay claims that Gilligan's "ethic of care" provides a plausible explanation for the results of two studies that found men and women handling ethical dilemmas in business differently. This paper also speculates briefly about the management implications of Gilligan's ideas.
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  • Board Gender Quotas: Exploring Ethical Tensions From A Multi-Theoretical Perspective.Siri Terjesen & Ruth Sealy - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (1):23-65.
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  • Women on Corporate Boards: A Comparative Institutional Analysis.Stephen Brammer, Bruce Rayton & Johanne Grosvold - 2016 - Business and Society 55 (8):1157-1196.
    How do a country’s basic institutions enable or hinder women’s rise to the boards of public companies? The study evaluates this question with reference to the five basic institutions that research suggests are common across all countries: family, education, economy, government, and religion. The study draws on a sample, which consists of 23 countries, and the study is framed in neo-institutional theory. In analyzing the role of these institutions, the article seeks to understand better the relationships between specific institutions and (...)
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  • Why Does Board Gender Diversity Matter and How Do We Get There? The Role of Shareholder Activism in Deinstitutionalizing Old Boys’ Networks.Elise Perrault - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 128 (1):149-165.
    This essay bridges together social network and institutional perspectives to examine how women on boards, by breaking up directors’ homophilous networks, contribute to board effectiveness. It proposes that through real and symbolic representations, women enhance perceptions of the board’s instrumental, relational, and moral legitimacy, leading to increased perceptions of the board’s trustworthiness which in turn fosters shareholders’ trust in the firm. Envisioning the gender diversification of boards as an event of institutional change, this article considers the critical role of shareholder (...)
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  • Board Diversity and Corporate Social Responsibility.Maretno Harjoto, Indrarini Laksmana & Robert Lee - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 132 (4):641-660.
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