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  1. Consequences of Pragmatism.Richard Rorty - 1982 - University of Minnesota Press.
    Preface This volume contains essays written during the period 1972-1980. They are arranged roughly in order of composition. Except for the Introduction, ...
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  • Beyond Objectivism and Relativism: Science, Hermeneutics, and Praxis.Richard J. Bernstein - 1984 - University of Pennsylvania Press.
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  • Rorty on Objectivity, Truth, and Social Consensus.Kenneth T. Gallagher - 1984 - International Philosophical Quarterly 24 (2):111-124.
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  • Hermeneneutics and the Social Sciences: A Gadamerian Critique of Rorty.Georgia Warnke - 1985 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 28 (1-4):339 – 357.
    Richard Rorty challenges the traditional use of hermeneutic understanding to defend the methodological autonomy of the social sciences, claiming that hermeneutics is part of both social and natural science and, moreover, that it exposes the limits of ?epistemologically centered philosophy?. Hermeneutics is interested in edification rather than truth, in finding new ways of speaking rather than adjudicating knowledge claims or securing the grounds of rational consensus. Although Rorty refers to Gadamer's ?philosophical hermeneutics? as support for this position, Gadamer's own analysis (...)
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  • Hermeneutics, Transcendental Philosophy and Social Science.Mark B. Okrent - 1984 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 27 (1-4):23 – 49.
    It has frequently been argued that there must be a necessary and important difference between the methods of the natural and social sciences, or that an empirical method in social science must be supplemented by or is inferior to an interpretative method. Often these claims have been supported by arguments using premises derived from the early Heidegger or the late Wittgenstein. These arguments, in turn, tend either to be transcendental in form or to follow a hermeneutic argument strategy. This paper (...)
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