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  1. What Isn't Wrong with Ecosystem Ecology.Jay Odenbaugh - unknown
    Philosophers of the life sciences have devoted considerably more attention to evolutionary theory and genetics than to the various sub-disciplines of ecology, but recent work in the philosophy of ecology suggests reflects a growing interest in this area (Cooper 2003; Ginzburg and Colyvan 2004). However, philosophers of biology and ecology have focused almost entirely on conceptual and methodological issues in population and community ecology; conspicuously absent are foundational investigations in ecosystem ecology. This situation is regrettable. Ecosystem concepts play a central (...)
     
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  • Science as Social Knowledge.Sharon L. Crasnow - 1993 - Hypatia 8 (3):194-201.
    In Science as Social Knowledge, Helen Longino offers a contextual analysis of evidential relevance. She claims that this "contextual empiricism" reconciles the objectivity of science with the claim that science is socially constructed. I argue that while her account does offer key insights into the role that values play in science, her claim that science is nonetheless objective is problematic.
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  • Science as Social Knowledge.Sharon L. Crasnow - 1992 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (2):283-285.
    In Science as Social Knowledge, Helen Longino offers a contextual analysis of evidential relevance. She claims that this "contextual empiricism" reconciles the objectivity of science with the claim that science is socially constructed. I argue that while her account does offer key insights into the role that values play in science, her claim that science is nonetheless objective is problematic.
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  • Value-Free Science?: Ideals and Illusions.Harold Kincaid, John Dupré & Alison Wylie (eds.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    It has long been thought that science is our best hope for realizing objective knowledge, but that, to deliver on this promise, it must be value free. Things are not so simple, however, as recent work in science studies makes clear. The contributors to this volume investigate where and how values are involved in science, and examine the implications of this involvement for ideals of objectivity.
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  • Six Domains of Research Ethics: A Heuristic Framework for the Responsible Conduct of Research.Kenneth D. Pimple - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (2):191-205.
    The purpose of this paper is to provide a simple yet comprehensive organizing scheme for the responsible conduct of research (RCR). The heuristic offered here should prove helpful in research ethics education, where the many and heterogeneous elements of RCR can be bewildering, as well as research into research integrity and efforts to form RCR policy and regulations. The six domains are scientific integrity, collegiality, protection of human subjects, animal welfare, institutional integrity, and social responsibility.
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  • Do Deconstructive Ecology and Sociobiology Undermine Leopold’s Land Ethic?J. Baird Callicott - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (4):353-372.
    Recent deconstructive developments in ecology and the advent of sociobiology may seem to undermine the scientific foundations of environmental ethics, especially the Leopold land ethic. A reassessment of the Leopold land ethic in light of these developments indicates that the land ethic is still a viable environmental ethic, if judiciously updated and revised.
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  • Norton’s Conception of Sustainability: Political, Not Metaphysical?Kevin Elliott - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):3-22.
    In his new book, Sustainability: A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management, Bryan G. Norton proposes an account of sustainability grounded in the deliberation of local communities as part of an adaptive management process. One can distinguish two different ways of justifying his account—resulting in “political” and “metaphysical” conceptions of sustainability—in much the same way that John Rawls famously distinguishes between political and metaphysical conceptions of justice. Whereas the metaphysical conception of sustainability depends on principles that are specific to American pragmatist (...)
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  • Contemporary Environmental Ethics From Metaethics to Public Philosophy.Andrew Light - 2002 - Metaphilosophy 33 (4):426-449.
    In the past thirty years environmental ethics has emerged as one of the most vibrant and exciting areas of applied philosophy. Several journals and hundreds of books testify to its growing importance inside and outside philosophical circles. But with all of this scholarly output, it is arguably the case that environmental ethics is not living up to its promise of providing a philosophical contribution to the resolution of environmental problems. This article surveys the current state of the field and offers (...)
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  • Conceptual Clarification and Policy-Related Science: The Case of Chemical Hormesis.Kevin Elliott - 2000 - Perspectives on Science 8 (4):346-366.
    : This paper examines the epistemological warrant for a toxicological phenomenon known as chemical hormesis. First, it argues that conceptual confusion contributes significantly to current disagreements about the status of chemical hormesis as a biological hypothesis. Second, it analyzes seven distinct concepts of chemical hormesis, arguing that none are completely satisfactory. Finally, it suggests three ramifications of this analysis for ongoing debates about the epistemological status of chemical hormesis. This serves as a case study supporting the value of philosophical methodologies (...)
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  • Toxic Torts: Science, Law and the Possibility of Justice.Carl F. Cranor - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    The relationship between science, law and justice has become a pressing issue with US Supreme Court decisions beginning with Daubert v. Merrell-Dow Pharmaceutical. How courts review scientific testimony and its foundation before trial can substantially affect the possibility of justice for persons wrongfully injured by exposure to toxic substances. If courts do not review scientific testimony, they will deny one of the parties the possibility of justice. Even if courts review evidence well, the fact and perception of greater judicial scrutiny (...)
     
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  • Hormonal Chaos: The Scientific and Social Origins of the Environmental Endocrine Hypothesis.Sheldon Krimsky - 2001 - Journal of the History of Biology 34 (1):195-197.
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  • Science and Technology in Society: From Biotechnology to the Internet.Daniel Lee Kleinman - 2005 - Blackwell.
    This thoughtful and engaging text challenges the widely held notion of science as somehow outside of society, and the idea that technology proceeds automatically down a singular and inevitable path. Through specific case studies involving contemporary debates, this book shows that science and technology are fundamentally part of society and are shaped by it. Draws on concepts from political sociology, organizational analysis, and contemporary social theory. Avoids dense theoretical debate. Includes case studies and concluding chapter summaries for students and scholars.
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  • Environmental Pragmatism as Philosophy or Metaphilosophy? On the Weston-Katz Debate.Andrew Light - 1996 - In Andrew Light & Eric Katz (eds.), Environmental Pragmatism. Routledge. pp. 325--338.
  • How the Tail Wags the Dog: How Value Judgments Determine Ecological Science.K. S. Shrader-Frechette & Earl D. McCoy - 1994 - Environmental Values 3 (2):107-120.
    Philosophers, policymakers, and scientists have long asserted that ecological science – and especially notions of homeostasis, balance, or stability – help to determine environmental values and to supply imperatives for environmental ethics and policy. We argue that this assertion is questionable. There are no well developed general ecological theories having predictive power, and fundamental ecological concepts, such as 'community' and 'stability', are used in inconsistent and ambiguous ways. As a consequence, the contribution of ecology to environmental ethics and values lies (...)
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  • Sustainability : A Philosophy of Adaptive Ecosystem Management.Bryan G. Norton - 2005 - University of Chicago Press.
    Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-226-595 19-6 (cloth : alk. paper) . A . 1. Environmental policy. 2. Environmental management — Decision making. 3. Interdisciplinary research. 4. Communication in science. 5. Sustainable ...
  • Regulating Toxic Substances: A Philosophy of Science and the Law.Carl F. Cranor - 1993 - Oxford University Press, Usa.
    In this book, Carl Cranor utilizes material from ethics, philosophy of law, epidemiology, tort law, regulatory law, and risk assessment to argue that the evidentiary standards for science used in the law to control toxics ought to be ...
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  • Methods and Metaphors in Community Ecology: The Problem of Defining Stability.Greg Mikkelson - manuscript
    Scientists must sometimes choose between competing definitions of key terms. The degree to which different definitions facilitate important dis- coveries should ultimately guide decisions about which terms to accept. In the short run, rules of thumb can help. One such rule is to regard with suspicion any definition that turns a seemingly important empiri- cal matter into an a priori exercise. Several prominent definitions of eco- logical “stability” are suspect, according to this rule. After evaluating alternatives, I suggest that the (...)
     
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  • Understanding Risk: Informing Decisions in a Democratic Society.Paul C. Stern & Harvey V. Fineberg (eds.) - 1996 - National Academies Press.
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  • The Honest Broker: Making Sense of Science in Policy and Politics.Roger A. Pielke Jr, - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Relevant to a wide range of scientific disciplines, this is a practical guide for scientists, politicians and citizens to the relationship between science and politics.
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  • Towards a Pragmatic Approach to Definition:“Wetlands” and the Politics of Meaning.Edward Schiappa - 1996 - In Andrew Light & Eric Katz (eds.), Environmental Pragmatism. Routledge. pp. 209--230.
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  • Inserting the Public Into Science.Heather Douglas - 2005 - In Sabine Maasen & Peter Weingart (eds.), Democratization of Expertise? Exploring Novel Forms of Scientific Advice in Political Decision-Making. Springer. pp. 153--169.
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