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  1. A Concise Introduction to Logic.Patrick J. Hurley - 2000 - Wadsworth.
    Preface The most immediate benefit derived from the study of logic is the skill needed to construct sound arguments of one's own and to evaluate the ...
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  • Aristotle on the Human Good.Richard Kraut - 1989 - Princeton University Press.
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  • Testing for Athlete Citizenship: Regulating Doping and Sex in Sport.T. Rachel Park, Emmanuel Macedo, Brett A. Diaz & Francisco Javier Lopez Frias - forthcoming - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-5.
    In Testing for Athlete Citizenship: Regulating Doping and Sex in Sport, Kathryn E. Henne provides ‘a genealogical account of anti-doping regulation by questioning the meanings we take from sport’ (...
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  • Beyond Habermas, with Habermas: Adjudicating Ethical Issues in Sport Through a Discourse Ethics-Based Normative Theory of Sport.Francisco Javier Lopez Frias - 2019 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 15 (1):43-58.
    In this article, I revise the normative account of sport that I proposed in ‘William J. Morgan’s “conventionalist internalism” approach. Furthering internalism? A critical hermeneutical response.’...
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  • Games: Agency as Art.C. Thi Nguyen - 2020 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Games occupy a unique and valuable place in our lives. Game designers do not simply create worlds; they design temporary selves. Game designers set what our motivations are in the game and what our abilities will be. Thus: games are the art form of agency. By working in the artistic medium of agency, games can offer a distinctive aesthetic value. They support aesthetic experiences of deciding and doing. -/- And the fact that we play games shows something remarkable about us. (...)
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  • Loving the Fine: Virtue and Happiness in Artistotle's Ethics.Anna Lannstrom - 2006 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Assuming that people want to be happy, can we show that they cannot be happy without being ethical, and that all rational people therefore should be able to see that it is in their own best interest to be ethical? Is it irrational to reject ethics? Aristotle thought so, claims Anna Lännström; but, she adds, he also thought that there was no way to prove it to a skeptic or an immoral person. Lännström probes Artistotle's view that desire is crucial (...)
     
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  • Happy Lives and the Highest Good: An Essay on Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics".Gabriel Richardson Lear - 2005 - Princeton University Press.
    Gabriel Richardson Lear presents a bold new approach to one of the enduring debates about Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics: the controversy about whether it coherently argues that the best life for humans is one devoted to a single activity, namely philosophical contemplation. Many scholars oppose this reading because the bulk of the Ethics is devoted to various moral virtues--courage and generosity, for example--that are not in any obvious way either manifestations of philosophical contemplation or subordinated to it. They argue that Aristotle (...)
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  • Two Conceptions of Happiness.Richard Kraut - 1979 - Philosophical Review 88 (2):167-197.
    I argue that the many similarities between what aristotle says about "eudaimonia" and what we say about happiness justify the traditional translation of "eudaimonia" as "happiness." it is not widely realized that "eudaimonia" involves a psychological state much like the one we call "happiness." nor is it generally recognized that both "eudaimonia" and "happiness" involve a standard for evaluating lives. For aristotle, The standard is objective and inflexible; for us, It is subjective and flexible. Thus, When we call someone happy (...)
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  • The Grasshopper: Games, Life and Utopia.Bernard Suits & Thomas Hurka - 1978 - Broadview Press.
    In the mid twentieth century the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein famously asserted that games are indefinable; there are no common threads that link them all. "Nonsense," says the sensible Bernard Suits: "playing a game is a voluntary attempt to overcome unnecessary obstacles." The short book Suits wrote demonstrating precisely that is as playful as it is insightful, as stimulating as it is delightful. Suits not only argues that games can be meaningfully defined; he also suggests that playing games is a central (...)
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  • A Kantian View of Suits’ Utopia: ‘A Kingdom of Autotelically-Motivated Game Players’.Francisco Javier Lopez Frias - 2017 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 44 (1):138-151.
    In this paper, I engage the debate on Suits’ theory of games by providing a Kantian view of Utopia. I argue that although the Kantian aspects of Suits’ approach are often overlooked in comparison to its Socratic-Platonic aspects, Kant’s ideas play a fundamental role in Suits’ proposal. In particular, Kant’s concept of ‘regulative idea’ is the basis of Suits’ Utopia. I regard Utopia as Suits’ regulative idea on game playing. In doing so, I take Utopia to play a double role (...)
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  • Beyond Autotelic Play.Stephen E. Schmid - 2011 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 38 (2):149-166.
    In the Philosophy of Sport literature, play has been widely conceived, in whole or part, as an autotelic activity; that is, an activity pursued for intrinsic factors. I examine several versions of the conception of play as an autotelic activity. Given these different accounts, I raise the question whether the concept of autotelic play is tenable. I examine three possibilities: (i) accept the concept of autotelic play and reject the possibility of satisfying the conditions for play activities; (ii) accept the (...)
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  • “Some Further Words on Suits on Play”.William J. Morgan - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (2):120-141.
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  • The Paper World of Bernard Suits.Allan Bäck - 2008 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 35 (2):156-174.
  • Aristotle on the Function of Man: Fallacies, Heresies and Other Entertainments.Bernard Suits - 1974 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):23 - 40.
    It has long been believed that if man had a special function appropriate to him, and that if we could discover what it was, then we would be in a perfect position to solve all of the basic problems of ethics. For if we were, for example, shovels, and knew ourselves to be shovels, then we would also know that to spend our lives in digging would best serve our fundamental interests, realize our highest aspirations, and be in every respect (...)
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  • Aristotle on the Human Good.Richard KRAUT - 1989 - Philosophy 66 (256):246-247.
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  • Kinesis and Energeia—and What Follows. Outline of a Typology of Human Actions.Carl Erik Kühl - 2008 - Axiomathes 18 (3):303-338.
    This paper presents a typology of human actions, based on Aristotle’s kinesis–energeia dichotomy and on a formal elaboration (with some refinement) of the Vendler–Kenny classificatory schemes for action types (or action verbs). The types introduced are defined throughout by inferential criteria, in terms of what here are referred to as “modal-temporal expressions” (‘MT-terms’). Examples of familiar categories analysed in this way are production and maintenance, but the procedure is meant to offer a basis for defining various other commonsense categories. Among (...)
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  • Bernard Suits’ Response to the Question on the Meaning of Life as a Critique of Modernity.Francisco Javier Lopez Frias - 2018 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (3-4):406-418.
    ABSTRACTThe Grasshopper: Games, Life and Utopia by Bernard Suits is one of the most influential works in the philosophy of sport. In the book, Suits investigates two fundamental issues in general p...
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  • Bernard Suits’ Legacy: New Inspirations and Interpretations.Filip Kobiela, Francisco Javier Lopez Frias & Jose Luis Perez Trivino - 2019 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 13 (3-4):271-276.
    ABSTRACTIn this article, we contextualize and introduce the papers that comprise the special issue, “Bernard Suits’ Legacy: New Inspirations and Interpretations.” The articles discuss the work of S...
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  • Aristotle on the Human Good.Richard KRAUT - 1989 - Ethics 101 (2):382-391.
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  • Tricky Triad: Games, Play, and Sport.Bernard Suits - 1988 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 15 (1):1-9.
  • Bernard Suits on Capacities: Games, Perfectionism, and Utopia.Christopher C. Yorke - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (2):177-188.
    ABSTRACTAn essential and yet often neglected motivation of Bernard Suits’ elevation of gameplay to the ideal of human existence is his account of capacities along perfectionist lines and the function of games in eliciting them. In his work Suits treats the expression of these capacities as implicitly good and the purest expression of the human telos. Although it is a possible interpretation to take Suits’ utopian vision to mean that gameplay in his future utopia must consist of the logically inevitable (...)
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  • Reconsidering Autotelic Play.Stephen E. Schmid - 2009 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 36 (2):238-257.
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  • Words On Play.Bernard Suits - 1977 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 4 (1):117-131.
  • The Elements of Sport.Bernard Suits - 2007 - In William J. Morgan (ed.), Ethics in Sport. Human Kinetics. pp. 9--19.
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  • Aristotle's Argument for a Human Function.Rachel Barney - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 34:293-322.
    A generally ignored feature of Aristotle’s famous function argument is its reliance on the claim that practitioners of the crafts (technai) have functions: but this claim does important work. Aristotle is pointing to the fact that we judge everyday rational agency and agents by norms which are independent of their contingent desires: a good doctor is not just one who happens to achieve his personal goals through his work. But, Aristotle argues, such norms can only be binding on individuals if (...)
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  • Aristotle on Eudaimonia.J. L. Ackrill - 1975 - Oxford University Press.
     
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