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  1. Dog-Helen and Homeric Insult.Margaret Graver - 1995 - Classical Antiquity 14 (1):41-61.
    Helen's self-disparagement is an anomaly in epic diction, and this is especially true of those instances where she refers to herself as "dog" and "dog-face." This essay attempts to show that Helen's dog-language, in that it remains in conflict with other features of her characterization, has some generic significance for epic, helping to establish the superiority of epic performance over competing performance types which treated her differently. The metaphoric use of χύων and its derivatives has not been well understood: the (...)
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  • Helen in the Iliad; Ca Usa Belli and Victim of War: From Silent Weaver to Public Speaker.Hanna M. Roisman - 2006 - American Journal of Philology 127 (1):1-36.
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  • Helen of Troy and Her Shameless Phantom. [REVIEW]Michael Clarke & N. Austin - 1996 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 116:190-190.
  • The Heart of Achilles: Characterization and Personal Ethics in the Iliad.Michael Clarke & G. Zanker - 1996 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 116:190-191.
  • Homeric Soundings: The Shaping of the Iliad.William F. Wyatt & O. Taplin - 1994 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 114:180-180.
  • Homeric Voices: Discourse, Memory, Gender.Elizabeth Minchin - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Homeric Voices is a study, from a compositional point of view, of the substantial speeches and exchanges of speech that Homer depicts in his songs.
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