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  1. The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism.Max Weber, Talcott Parsons & R. H. Tawney - 1930 - Charles Scribnerr's Sons.
    The Protestant ethic — a moral code stressing hard work, rigorous self-discipline, and the organization of one's life in the service of God — was made famous by sociologist and political economist Max Weber. In this brilliant study (his best-known and most controversial), he opposes the Marxist concept of dialectical materialism and its view that change takes place through "the struggle of opposites." Instead, he relates the rise of a capitalist economy to the Puritan determination to work out anxiety over (...)
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  • Recovering Religion's Prophetic Voice for Business Ethics.Martin S. J. Calkins - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 23 (4):339 - 352.
    This article surveys western business ethics' recent history to show how this ethic has neglected recently its religious traditions and become construed more narrowly as an applied philosophy and social science. It argues that this narrowness has confused business ethics' role in business education and helped to weaken the distinctiveness of certain institutions of higher education. It then suggests ways that western business ethics might become more integrated, interesting, and autonomous as an academic discipline by incorporating its key religious traditions.
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  • Religiousness and Business Ethics.Ellen J. Kennedy & Leigh Lawton - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (2):163-175.
    There is strong theoretical support for a relationship between various characteristics of religiousness and attitudes towards business ethics. This paper examines three frequently- studied dimensions of religiousness (fundamentalism, conservatism, and intrinsic religiousness) and their ability to predict students' willingness to behave unethically. Because prior research indicated a possible relationship between the religious affiliation of an institution and its members' ethical orientation, we studied students at universities with three different types of religious affiliation: evangelical, Catholic, and none.Results of the study lend (...)
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  • Right From Wrong: The Influence of Spirituality on Perceptions of Unethical Business Activities. [REVIEW]Robert A. Giacalone & Carole L. Jurkiewicz - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 46 (1):85 - 97.
    A network sample of 162 employees from across the U.S. was studied to assess the relationship between individual spirituality and perceptions of unethical business activities. Analyses indicate that degree of individual spirituality influences whether an individual perceives a questionable business practice as ethical or unethical. Ramifications of these findings regarding the role of spirituality in enhancing workplace ethicality, as well as directions for future research, are discussed.
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  • Does Your Religion Make a Difference in Your Business Ethics? The Case of Consolidated Foods.Louke Van Wensveen Siker, James A. Donahue & Ronald M. Green - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (11):819 - 832.
    While the literature in business ethics abounds with philosophical analyses, perspectives from religious thinkers are curiously underrepresented. What religious analysis has occured has often been moralistic in tone, more fit to the pulpit than the classroom or the boardroom. In the three essays that follow, presented originally at a panel at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Religion in 1989, ethicists from the Protestant, Roman Catholic, and Jewish traditions analyze a case study familiar to many who teach and (...)
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  • Religion, Opportunism, and International Market Entry Via Non-Equity Alliances or Joint Ventures.Ning Li - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):771-789.
    One challenge that globalization has brought to business is that firms, as they expand their market globally through cross-border alliances, need to deal with partner firms from countries of different religious background. The impact of a country’s dominant religion on its firms’ international market entry mode choices has not been examined in traditional approaches. Focusing on hypothesizing the influence of Christian beliefs and atheism (i.e., the absence of belief in any deities), this research aims to fill the gap by exploring (...)
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  • Consumer Support for Corporate Social Responsibility : The Role of Religion and Values.Bala Ramasamy, Matthew C. H. Yeung & Alan K. M. Au - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (S1):61-72.
    Ethical behavior among businesses has gained significant prominence in recent years. Survey evidence shows that Asian consumers demand for greater social responsibility among businesses. Thus, a deeper understanding of the factors that contribute to such a demand is useful. This study examines the influence of religiosity and values on corporate social responsibility (CSR) support among consumers in Hong Kong and Singapore. Primary data collected among consumers in these cities point to a significant direct relationship between religiosity and CSR support. In (...)
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