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  1. Embodied Subjects and Fragmented Objects: Women’s Bodies, Assisted Reproduction Technologies and the Right to Self-Determination.Jyotsna Agnihotri Gupta & Annemiek Richters - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (4):239-249.
    This article focuses on the transformation of the female reproductive body with the use of assisted reproduction technologies under neo-liberal economic globalisation, wherein the ideology of trade without borders is central, as well as under liberal feminist ideals, wherein the right to self-determination is central. Two aspects of the body in western medicine—the fragmented body and the commodified body, and the integral relation between these two—are highlighted. This is done in order to analyse the implications of local and global transactions (...)
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  • Value in Ethics and Economics.Elizabeth Anderson - 1993 - Harvard University Press.
    Women as commercial baby factories, nature as an economic resource, life as one big shopping mall: This is what we get when we use the market as a common ...
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  • Making Parents the Ontological Choreography of Reproductive Technologies.Charis Thompson - 2005
     
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  • Feminism Seduced: How Global Elites Use Women’s Labor and Ideas to Exploit the World.[author unknown] - 2010
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  • Towards Transnational Feminisms: Some Reflections and Concerns in Relation to the Globalization of Reproductive Technologies.Jyotsna Agnihotri Gupta - 2006 - European Journal of Women's Studies 13 (1):23-38.
    This article discusses the emergence of the concept of ‘transnational feminisms’ as a differentiated notion from ‘global sisterhood’ within feminist postcolonial criticism. This is done in order to examine its usefulness for interrogating the globalization of reproductive technologies and women’s right to selfdetermination over their own bodies by using these technologies. In particular, women’s use of technologies for assisted conception, and the local and global transactions in reproductive body parts form a testing ground for transnational feminisms. Does the construction of (...)
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  • " At Least I Am Not Sleeping with Anyone": Resisting the Stigma of Commercial Surrogacy in India.Amrita Pande - 2010 - Feminist Studies 36 (2):292-312.
  • Altruistic Surrogacy: The Necessary Objectification of Surrogate Mothers.M. M. Tieu - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (3):171-175.
    Next SectionOne of the major concerns about surrogacy is the potential harm that may be inflicted upon the surrogate mother and the child after relinquishment. Even if one were to take the liberal view that surrogacy should be presumptively allowed on the basis of autonomy and/or compassion, evidence of harm must be taken seriously. In this paper I review the evidence from psychological studies on the effect that relinquishing a child has on the surrogate mother and while it appears that (...)
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  • Embodied Progress a Cultural Account of Assisted Conception.Sarah Franklin - 1997
     
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  • "Discipline and Punish.Michel Foucault - 1975 - Vintage Books.
  • Fair Trade International Surrogacy.Casey Humbyrd - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (3):111-118.
    Since the development of assisted reproductive technologies, infertile individuals have crossed borders to obtain treatments unavailable or unaffordable in their own country. Recent media coverage has focused on the outsourcing of surrogacy to developing countries, where the cost for surrogacy is significantly less than the equivalent cost in a more developed country. This paper discusses the ethical arguments against international surrogacy. The major opposition viewpoints can be broadly divided into arguments about welfare, commodification and exploitation. It is argued that the (...)
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  • Babies, Child Bearers and Commodification: Anderson, Brazier Et Al., and the Political Economy of Commercial Surrogate Motherhood. [REVIEW]Hugh V. McLachlan & J. K. Swales - 2000 - Health Care Analysis 8 (1):1-18.
    It is argued by Anderson and also in the BrazierReport that Commercial Surrogate Motherhood (C.S.M.)contracts and agencies should be illegal on thegrounds that C.S.M. involves the commodification ofboth mothers and babies. This paper takes issue withthis view and argues that C.S.M. is not inconsistentwith the proper respect for, and treatment of,children and women. A case for the legalisation ofC.S.M. is made.
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  • Ethical Issues in Gestational Surrogacy.Rosalie Ber - 2000 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (2):153-169.
    The introduction of contraceptive technologies hasresulted in the separation of sex and procreation. Theintroduction of new reproductive technologies (mainlyIVF and embryo transfer) has led not only to theseparation of procreation and sex, but also to there-definition of the terms mother and family.For the purpose of this essay, I will distinguishbetween:1. the genetic mother – the donor of the egg;2. the gestational mother – she who bears and gives birth to the baby;3. the social mother – the woman who raises the (...)
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  • Care Ethics and the Global Practice of Commercial Surrogacy.Jennifer A. Parks - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (7):333-340.
    This essay will focus on the moral issues relating to surrogacy in the global context, and will critique the liberal arguments that have been offered in support of it. Liberal arguments hold sway concerning reproductive arrangements made between commissioning couples from wealthy nations and the surrogates from socioeconomically weak backgrounds that they hire to do their reproductive labor. My argument in this paper is motivated by a concern for controlling harms by putting the practice of globalized commercial surrogacy into the (...)
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  • Enhancing Autonomy in Paid Surrogacy.Jennifer Damelio & Kelly Sorensen - 2008 - Bioethics 22 (5):269–277.
    The gestational surrogate – and her economic and educational vulnerability in particular – is the focus of many of the most persistent worries about paid surrogacy. Those who employ her, and those who broker and organize her services, usually have an advantage over her in resources and information. That asymmetry exposes her to the possibility of exploitation and abuse. Accordingly, some argue for banning paid surrogacy. Others defend legal permission on grounds of surrogate autonomy, but often retain concerns about the (...)
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  • In Whose Interest? Policy and Politics in Assisted Reproduction.Anne Donchin - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (2):92-101.
    This paper interprets the British legislative process that initiated the first comprehensive national regulation of embryo research and fertility services and examines subsequent efforts to restrain the assisted reproduction industry. After describing and evaluating British regulatory measures, I consider successive failures to control the assisted reproduction industry in the US. I discuss disparities between UK and US regulatory initiatives and their bearing on regulation in other countries. Then I turn to the political and social structures in which the assisted reproduction (...)
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  • The Exploitation Argument Against Commercial Surrogacy.Stephen Wilkinson - 2003 - Bioethics 17 (2):169–187.
    It is argued that there are good reasons for believing that commercial surrogacy is often exploitative. However, even if we accept this, the exploitation argument for prohibiting (or otherwise legislatively discouraging) commercial surrogacy remains quite weak. One reason for this is that prohibition may well 'backfire' and lead to potential surrogates having to do other things that are more exploitative and/or more harmful than paid surrogacy. It is concluded, therefore, that those who oppose exploitation should concentrate on: (a) improving the (...)
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